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Latest American Museum of Natural History Stories

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2009-04-17 09:39:18

Records test competing theories about the evolution of local species There is a new tool for those developing conservation strategies for threatened species and landscapes: museum specimens. Richard Pearson and Christopher Raxworthy of the American Museum of Natural History dusted off a number of collections from Madagascar and used the location information associated with each species to test different ideas regarding the evolution of locally distributed endemism (unique species confined to...

2009-04-10 08:08:11

Largest 17th century bead repository found in coastal GeorgiaFrench and Chinese blue glass, Dutch layered glass, Baltic amber: roughly 70,000 beads manufactured all over the world have been excavated at one of the Spanish empire's remotest outposts, the Santa Catalina de Guale Mission. The beads were found as part of an extensive, ongoing research project led by a team of scientists from the American Museum of Natural History on St. Catherines Island off the coast of Georgia. Comprising the...

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2009-03-24 09:24:27

Yes, according to a new fossil discovery in Montana's Homer Site Until now, Triceratops was thought to be unusual among its ceratopsid relatives. While many ceratopsids"”a common group of herbivorous dinosaurs that lived toward the end of the Cretaceous"”have been found in enormous bonebed deposits of multiple individuals, all known Triceratops (over 50 in total) fossils have been solitary individuals. But a new discovery of a jumble of at least three juveniles the badlands of the...

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2009-03-03 16:47:52

Researchers studying a type of fish that once lived in what is now Kansas and Oklahoma have discovered a 300-million-year-old fossilized brain. "For a long time, paleontologists have used the shape of the cranial cavity to research the general morphology of the brain, because soft tissue was not available until today," said Alan Pradel of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris. "Soft tissue has fossilized in the past, but it is usually muscle and organs like kidneys because of...

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2009-02-04 15:30:00

An international team of scientists announced Wednesday the discovery in northern Colombia of fossil remains of the largest snake ever known to have lived. The scientists named the 2,500 pound, 43 ft. long snake Titanoboa cerrejonensis ("ty-TAN-o-BO-ah sare-ah-HONE-en-siss"), meaning titanic boa from Cerrejon, the open-pit coal mine where the fossils were discovered. "This thing weighs more than a bison and is longer than a city bus," snake expert Jack Conrad of the American Museum of...

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2009-01-21 15:49:56

A new species of fish from tropical South America is confirming suspected roots to the loricariid catfish family tree. Lithogenes wahari shares traits with two different families of fish: the bony armor that protects its head and tail, and a grasping pelvic fin that allows it to climb vertical surfaces. The discovery of both of these characteristics in Lithogenes suggests to ichthyologists Scott Schaefer of the American Museum of Natural History and Francisco Provenzano of the Universidad...

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2009-01-12 13:38:37

Atlas of Scanning Electron Microscope Images of the Book Lung Published by the American Museum of Natural History Modern microscopy technology has allowed two scorpion biologists, Carsten Kamenz of the Humboldt University in Berlin and Lorenzo Prendini of the American Museum of Natural History, to study and document what is nearly invisible. Looking at tiny morphological features like the sculpting of the hair-like outgrowths on lamellae"”structures that fold like the leaves of a book...

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2008-12-22 13:36:37

Amplifying entire mitochondrial genomes yields new insight into evolution of malaria Even though the most deadly form of malaria for humans, Plasmodium falciparum, has been linked to malaria found in chimpanzees, this group has been fairly isolated on the malarial family tree "” until now. A new phylogenetic analysis from the Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics at the American Museum of Natural History reveals that malarial parasites found in tree-dwelling rats share a close...

ff7a4fb10a612a33d0f272e2f9a26e5d1
2008-12-16 15:32:58

Seeing the shape of material around black holes for first time Black holes can now be thought of as donut holes. The shape of material around black holes has been seen for the first time: an analysis of over 200 active galactic nuclei"”cores of galaxies powered by disks of hot material feeding a super-massive black hole"”shows that all have a consistent, ordered physical structure that seems to be independent of the black hole's size. "This should be a very messy and complicated...

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2008-12-15 14:33:55

New research highlights the ability to adapt to a changing Arctic As polar bears adapt to a warming Arctic - frozen seascape that cleaves earlier each spring - they may find relief in an unlikely source: snow goose eggs. New calculations show that changes in the timing of sea-ice breakup and of snow goose nesting near the western Hudson Bay could provide at least some polar bears with an alternative source of food. This new analysis appears in Polar Biology. "Over 40 years, six subadult male...


Latest American Museum of Natural History Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:52:09

Edwin Harris Colbert (September 28, 1905 – November 15, 2001), known as “Ned” to his friends and colleagues, was a distinguished American Paleontologist. He helped popularize the study of dinosaurs through his prolific research, writings, and 40 years of work as a curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Colbert was born in Clarinda, Iowa, but moved to Maryville, Missouri during infancy. Like many young children, and most of his predecessors and contemporaries,...

Barnum Brown
2013-10-14 11:03:30

Barnum Brown (February 12, 1873 – February 5, 1963) was an American Paleontologist best known for his contributions to the American Museum of Natural History, and his discovery of the first documented Tyrannosaurus rex remains. Brown was known less as a published paleontologist and more often as an energetic excavator, perhaps the greatest fossil collector of all time. Barnum Brown was born in Carbondale, Kansas, and was named after P.T. Barnum – of traveling circus fame, but no...

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Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
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