Quantcast

Latest American Museum of Natural History Stories

e9126f251dbfacf8fa356c7c5cb725b81
2008-12-12 15:53:36

You'd think that if scientists were to discover a new species, it would be in some remote, uncharted tropical forest, not a laboratory in New York. But a team from the Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics at the American Museum of Natural History has done the unexpected. Looking at the genes of the African dwarf crocodile, researchers found that the group"”genetically speaking"”comprises three distinct species rather than one. This not only ends a long debate about the...

e930973f712bb92c5a6cd76df97012ff1
2008-10-16 09:55:00

New research from the American Museum of Natural History shows that specialized diets arose independently It's confirmed: Even though flatback turtles dine on fish, shrimp, and mollusks, they are closely related to primarily herbivorous green sea turtles. New genetic research carried out by Eugenia Naro-Maciel, a Marine Biodiversity Scientist at the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation at the American Museum of Natural History, and colleagues clarifies our understanding of the...

e604c03835625fee71d90c6d5d1ef0751
2008-10-15 11:53:17

The American Museum of Natural History in New York is going into politics again this week with a new exhibition on climate change that curators say is an effort to separate fact from fear. Just three years after it's controversial evolution exhibition on Charles Darwin, the popular American museum is mounting a show called "Climate Change: The Threat to Life and A New Energy Future." Comprising hundreds of scientists and policymakers, a U.N. climate panel found last year with 90 percent...

f2aacbbeffccd3430496dcfe8e5dec211
2008-09-12 09:10:00

By the skin of their teeth 200 million years ago, dinosaurs defeated a fierce group of beasts competing for the right to rule the Earth, said scientists Tuesday. Dinosaurs emerged 230 million years ago, in the Triassic Period, and battled for almost 30 million years with a faction of vicious reptiles called crurotarsans, relatives of contemporary crocodiles that developed into gargantuan sizes and resembled dinosaurs. For awhile, most scientists supposed dinosaurs were basically more advanced...

2008-08-22 03:00:15

By Macdonald, Maritza Sloan, Heather; Miele, Eleanor; Powell, Wayne; Silvernail, David; Kinzler, Rosamond; Hong, Julia; Simon, Carmen ABSTRACT TRUST, or Teacher Renewal for Urban Science Teaching, is a National Science Foundation funded Earth science teacher preparation partnership between the American Museum of Natural History and Brooklyn and Lehman Colleges of the City University of New York. Our research and practice form a promising and replicable model for formal-informal partnership...

ad655da759fb668d595e2f0a65fba52f
2008-07-10 08:20:00

Large-brained simians of the New and Old Worlds independently arose from smaller-brained ancestors After taking a fresh look at an old fossil, John Flynn, Frick Curator of Paleontology at the American Museum of Natural History, and colleagues determined that the brains of the ancestors of modern Neotropical primates were as small as those of their early fossil simian counterparts in the Old World. This means one of the hallmarks of primate biology, increased brain size, arose independently in...

67681046f6b3eccc2e36101c30cba2e6
2008-07-01 15:25:00

Herpetologists discover that a Malagasy chameleon spends most of its short life in an egg There is a newly discovered life history among the 28,300 species of known tetrapods, or four-legged animals with backbones. A chameleon from arid southwestern Madagascar spends up to three-quarters of its life in an egg. Even more unusual, life after hatching is a mere 4 to 5 months. No other known four-legged animal has such a rapid growth rate and such a short life span. The new research is reported...

5b1ae52f02cfcdcce1a24c70067dce7f
2008-06-11 13:00:00

Newly completed checklists from the American Museum of Natural History highlight the importance of these pollinatorsScientists have discovered that there are more bee species than previously thought. In the first global accounting of bee species in over a hundred years, John S. Ascher, a research scientist in the Division of Invertebrate Zoology at the American Museum of Natural History, compiled online species pages and distribution maps for more than 19,200 described bee species, showcasing...

f51701b2264433705cd4afddabc72759
2008-06-09 13:15:00

New research from the American Museum of Natural History shows animals are moving uphillNew research from the American Museum of Natural History provides the first detailed study showing that global warming forces species to move up tropical mountains as their habitats shift upward. Christopher Raxworthy, Associate Curator in the Department of Herpetology, predicts that at least three species of amphibians and reptiles found in Madagascar's mountainous north could go extinct between 2050 and...

2ee9999abb0cda1b5e749ebc29f4320c1
2008-05-15 11:25:20

Solving the mystery of disease originsBefore West Nile virus arrived in this country, we had (and still have) a home-grown relative of this pathogen. An epidemic of unknown origin exploded around St. Louis, Missouri in the autumn of 1933, a disease that is now known to be transmitted by mosquitoes from birds to people. Now, a new analysis of the genome of St. Louis encephalitis completed at the Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) is...


Latest American Museum of Natural History Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:52:09

Edwin Harris Colbert (September 28, 1905 – November 15, 2001), known as “Ned” to his friends and colleagues, was a distinguished American Paleontologist. He helped popularize the study of dinosaurs through his prolific research, writings, and 40 years of work as a curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Colbert was born in Clarinda, Iowa, but moved to Maryville, Missouri during infancy. Like many young children, and most of his predecessors and contemporaries,...

Barnum Brown
2013-10-14 11:03:30

Barnum Brown (February 12, 1873 – February 5, 1963) was an American Paleontologist best known for his contributions to the American Museum of Natural History, and his discovery of the first documented Tyrannosaurus rex remains. Brown was known less as a published paleontologist and more often as an energetic excavator, perhaps the greatest fossil collector of all time. Barnum Brown was born in Carbondale, Kansas, and was named after P.T. Barnum – of traveling circus fame, but no...

More Articles (2 articles) »
Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
Related