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Latest Aminoacyl-tRNA Stories

2014-07-15 00:20:40

SAN DIEGO, July 14, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- aTyr Pharma, an innovative rare disease therapeutics enterprise announced today, the scientific publication of a splice variant of a tRNA synthetase in association with a rare muscle disease. This article, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, demonstrated novel findings relative to Physiocrine proteins, that include extracellular functions derived from the tRNA synthetase gene family. These data further highlight the potential...

Secret Of Herbal Malaria Cure Unlocked
2012-12-24 11:17:14

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online For over a millennium the Chinese have used an herb known as Chang Shan to treat fevers associated with malaria. While its effectiveness in treating the disease has long been confirmed by modern medicine, its exact function has remained mystery. However, in a recent study, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) say they have uncovered the molecular mechanism that gives this ancient homeopathic drug its healing...

2012-06-11 20:10:12

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, are working to develop substances that can prevent parasites, bacteria and fungi from producing essential proteins, research that could, in the long term, lead to new drugs for several major diseases. The World Health Organization (WHO) has announced that aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases — a type of enzyme — are important targets for the development of new drugs for several major diseases such as cancer, various parasitic diseases...

2011-03-23 20:50:10

A portion of the "code" of life has been unraveled by a UC Santa Barbara graduate student from the town of Jojutla, Mexico. Annia Rodriguez worked with John Perona, professor in UCSB's Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, to decipher intramolecular communication within a large RNA-protein enzyme responsible for expressing the genetic code for the amino acid glutamine. To their surprise, the experiments by Rodriguez captured a partial glimpse of how the genetic coding of life may have...

2010-05-25 05:00:00

SAN DIEGO, May 25 /PRNewswire/ -- aTyr announced today that John Mendlein, Ph. D., has joined their Board of Directors as Executive Chairman. The translation of aTyr's newly found class of proteins, resectins, into medicines of the future will benefit from Dr. Mendlein's experience in biologics, partnerships, and product strategy. Resectins may serve as potential replacement protein therapeutics or as targets for antagonists relevant to inflammation, blood disorders, and metabolic...

2009-12-14 12:45:46

The work provides insight into potential therapeutic for cancer and eye diseases Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute have solved a 10-year-old mystery of how a single protein from an ancient family of enzymes can have two completely distinct roles in the body. In addition to providing guidance for understanding other molecules in the family, the research supplies a theoretical underpinning for the protein's possible use for combating diseases including cancer and macular...

2009-12-14 05:00:00

SAN DIEGO, Dec. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- Research published in the December 13, 2009 edition of Nature Structural Biology uncovers the structural basis for the multifunctionality of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases are universal and essential enzymes of protein synthesis machinery found in all organisms. However, human synthetases and naturally occurring variants of these enzymes have additional activities that are vital to normal functioning of the complex human system...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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