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Frog Larvae Have Developed A Defensive Response Against The

Frog Larvae Have Developed A Defensive Response Against The Red Swamp Crayfish

FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology The common frog is one of the amphibians with the highest distribution in the Iberian Peninsula. It reproduces preferably in permanent areas of water where it comes into contact with the...

Latest Amphibian Stories

European Newts Establishing In The Wild In Australia
2014-06-30 03:18:12

Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions: ARC Once confined behind pet shop windows, the smooth newt (Lissotriton vulgaris) –a ‘controlled pest animal’ in Victoria – has made a new home in Melbourne’s peri urban fringe. Newts are aquatic amphibians that occur almost exclusively in the northern hemisphere, but in the scientific journal Biological Invasions, scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) and the Victorian Department of...

2014-05-06 23:13:32

Philadelphia area artist Steven Shachter of Wildlife Harmonies has been named a global partner of the Amphibian Survival Alliance, a leader in amphibian conservation. Philadelphia, PA (PRWEB) May 06, 2014 Wildlife and marine artist, Steven Shachter is pleased to announce Wildlife Harmonies, a Philadelphia-based organization that promotes the importance of protecting wildlife through illustrations, has been named a global partner of the Amphibian Survival Alliance. Through its new...

Climate Change Robs Frogs And Salamanders Of Refuge
2014-05-02 03:41:38

Sandra Hines / Lisa Hayward US Geological Survey By hightailing it to nearby ponds and shallow waterways, frogs and salamanders have – until now – had a way to evade exotic trout introduced to the West's high-mountain lakes for recreational fishing. A warming climate, however, will dry up some of the places where amphibians and their young have found refuge. Researchers in the May 1 issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment write about this challenge and a novel combination...

Atelopus varius
2014-04-18 06:29:37

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers from Arizona State University and Plymouth University in the UK are advocating changes to the way in which threatened species are identified, due to the potential danger presented to vulnerable animal populations by the so-called “gold standard” of collecting voucher specimens for identification purposes. Ordinarily, field biologists traditionally collect those specimens to distinguish animals and/or confirm that...

Climate Change May Be Shrinking Salamanders
2014-03-26 10:53:08

[ Watch the Video: Salamanders Shrinking Due to Climate Change ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from a team of American scientists has found that salamanders living in the Appalachian Mountains have been getting smaller and smaller over the last 55 years as climate change gradually makes their habitat warmer and drier. Published in the journal Global Change Biology, the new study was based on the examination of museum specimen salamanders collected...

A Biodiversity Hotspot Of Amphibians And Reptiles Discovered In Peru
2014-02-20 13:32:29

[ Watch the Video: Tracking Biodiversity in a Global Hotspot ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Biologists from several universities say Peru’s Manu National Park is the world’s top biodiversity hotspot for reptiles and amphibians. Manu National Park includes the lowland Amazonian rain forest, a high-altitude cloud forest and an Andean grassland east of Cuzco. It was designated as a UNESCO Biosphere Preserve in 1977 and a World Heritage Site in 1987. The...

2014-01-29 23:00:36

This frog species, which once hopped throughout California’s upper elevations, has dropped significantly in numbers, more than ninety percent in the past decade, due in part to chytrid, a skin fungus that thickens the frog’s skin so they can’t breathe. Oakland, CA (PRWEB) January 29, 2014 On Wednesday, February 5, 2014, from 6:30pm – 9:30pm, the public is invited to attend a Conservation Speaker Series focused on saving the mountain yellow- legged frog. This frog species, which...

Population Size Of Salamanders Helps Predict Forest Ecosystems Health, Inform Forest Management Decisions
2014-01-23 08:09:00

Jeff Sossamon - University of Missouri Researchers suggest a balance between timber harvest and conservation biology Woodland salamanders are small, lungless amphibians that live in moist, forest habitats throughout the US and the world. Salamanders often serve as vital links in forest food chains; their population size and recovery from major disturbances can help predict the health of forest ecosystems. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have determined that...

New Study Raises Hope To Fight Chytrid Amphibian Pathogen
2014-01-21 15:47:48

Helmholtz-Center for Environmental Research An international team of researchers has made important progress in understanding the distribution of the deadly amphibian chytrid pathogen. In some regions, the deadly impact of the pathogen appears to be hampered by small predators, naturally occurring in freshwater bodies. These micropredators may efficiently reduce the number of free-swimming infectious stages (zoospores) by consuming them. This natural behavior will reduce the infection...

Deadly Fungus Cause Of Frog Declines In The Andes
2013-12-13 07:25:23

San Francisco State University Amphibians at high elevations can tolerate temperature changes, but susceptible to deadly fungus A deadly fungus, and not climate change as is widely believed, is the primary culprit behind the rapid decline of frog populations in the Andes mountains, according to a new study published today in the journal Conservation Biology. Frogs living at higher elevations can tolerate increasing temperatures, researchers found, but their habitats fall within the...


Latest Amphibian Reference Libraries

Caecilian
2014-01-28 12:32:06

The Sagalla caecilian (Boulengerula niedini) is a long, earthworm-like amphibian from the family Caeciliidae. The species is native to the tiny area of south-eastern Kenya called Sagalla Hill. The Sagalla caecilian has a slender body, perfect for burrowing. Its skin is extremely pigmented, lending it a brownish color with a pinkish-red hint, and white cross segments that give the appearance of grooves. They can grow up to 12 inches in length. Along with tough skin and a bony head, the...

ringed caecilian
2014-01-28 11:21:49

The Ringed caecilian (Siphonops annulatus) is an amphibian species and a member of the Caeciliidae family. The species is native to South America, ranging Argentina, Volivia, Columbia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. The Ringed caelilian inhabits tropical or subtropical areas. Lowland forests, savannah, shrubland, grassland, pastureland, plantations and rural gardens are all habitats the species may occupy. The Ringed caecilian is known to...

Mexican burrowing caecilian
2014-01-28 10:29:33

The Mexican burrowing caecilian (Dermophis mexicanus) is an amphibian species from the family Dermophiidae. The Mexican burrowing caecilian is known to inhabit Mexico, Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and also in some secluded areas of the Pacific Slope. It tends to prefer habitats in subtropical or tropical dry forests, moist lowland forests, plantations, moist mountain forests, and rural gardens. It lives and spends most of its time burrowed in loose damp soil and under logs,...

Common Mud puppy
2014-01-28 09:30:07

The Common mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus) is a species of salamander. A member of the Proteidae family, this aquatic amphibian is native to eastern North America. The Common mudpuppy can be found in lakes, rivers and ponds. During the daytime the mudpuppy will bury itself under rocks and logs. The salamander often only becomes active at night when it leaves cover to feed. Orange-brown/rust coloration covers the body of the Common mudpuppy. Bluish-black spots appear on its head and back....

Chinese Fire Belly Newt, Cynops orientalis
2013-10-07 13:41:26

The Chinese Fire Belly Newt (Cynops orientalis) is a small black newt measuring about 2.2 to 4 inches. It has bright orange aposematic coloration on the ventral sides. C. orientalis is commonly seen in pet stores where it is frequently confused with the Japanese Fire Belly Newt (C. pyrrhogaster) because of similarities in size and in coloration. It typically exhibits smoother skin and a rounder tail than the C. pyrrhogaster, and has less obvious parotoid glands. They are mildly poisonous...

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Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.