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Latest Amphibian Stories

Deadly Fungus Cause Of Frog Declines In The Andes
2013-12-13 07:25:23

San Francisco State University Amphibians at high elevations can tolerate temperature changes, but susceptible to deadly fungus A deadly fungus, and not climate change as is widely believed, is the primary culprit behind the rapid decline of frog populations in the Andes mountains, according to a new study published today in the journal Conservation Biology. Frogs living at higher elevations can tolerate increasing temperatures, researchers found, but their habitats fall within the...

Survey Finds Frog Abnormalities Are Rare
2013-11-20 13:45:34

University of California, Davis A 10-year study shows some good news for frogs and toads on national wildlife refuges. The rate of abnormalities such as shortened or missing legs was less than 2 percent overall — indicating that the malformations first reported in the mid-1990s were rarer than feared. But much higher rates were found in local "hotspots," suggesting that where these problems occur they have local causes. The results were published Nov. 18 in the journal PLOS ONE. "We...

2013-10-24 11:57:40

The herbicide atrazine increased mortality from chytridiomycosis, a disease causing worldwide amphibian declines The combination of the herbicide atrazine and a fungal disease is particularly deadly to frogs, shows new research from a University of South Florida laboratory, which has been investigating the global demise of amphibian populations. USF Biologist Jason Rohr said the new findings show that early-life exposure to atrazine increases frog mortality but only when the frogs were...

2013-09-23 11:42:22

Systematic conservation planning is a multiple-objective process. Identification of important areas and species with high conservation priority is two of the research objectives. China is one of mega-biodiversity countries of the world. Along with rapid economic development and environmental degeneration, native and endemic species of China are confronting growing threats in the last two decades. It is an urgent agenda to set up relevant conservation policies, researches and decision supports...

2013-09-11 23:03:33

The journal Herpetologica presents a study in which Barton Springs Salamanders were exposed to three different species of fish predators—the Western Mosquitofish, Redbreasted Sunfish, and Largemouth Bass—and a blank water control. The current study used captive-bred salamanders that had never been exposed to the predators before and could not have a learned response. (PRWEB) September 11, 2013 How a species reacts to potential predators plays a role in how conservationists might...

Ancient Amphibian Burrowed
2013-09-03 10:54:30

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An ancient enormous amphibian known as Metoposaurus diagnosticus that once roamed modern day Poland some 230 million years ago probably spent the drier months in an underground burrow, according to a new report in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. With their flat heads, wide hands, and large tails, study investigators described Metoposaurus as a species that swam in transient lakes during the region’s wet season and most likely...

Tiny Frog Hears With Mouth
2013-09-03 08:37:46

[ Watch the Video: Gardiner's Frogs Use Their Mouths To Hear ] Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists had long assumed the Gardiner’s frog was deaf due to its lack of a middle ear. After further investigation and some X-ray images, however, they have now discovered that the frog species from the Seychelles Islands is capable of hearing through tiny bones in their mouths. Unlike other auditory systems common in a broad majority of living organisms, the...

Salamanders Threatened By Deadly Skin-eating Fungus
2013-09-03 07:59:33

Imperial College London A new species of fungus that eats amphibians' skin has ravaged the fire salamander population in the Netherlands, bringing it close to regional extinction. Fire salamanders, recognizable by their distinctive yellow and black skin patterns, have been found dead in the country's forests since 2010. The population has fallen to around 10 individuals, less than four per cent of its original level, but what has been killing them has been a mystery until now....


Latest Amphibian Reference Libraries

Caecilian
2014-01-28 12:32:06

The Sagalla caecilian (Boulengerula niedini) is a long, earthworm-like amphibian from the family Caeciliidae. The species is native to the tiny area of south-eastern Kenya called Sagalla Hill. The Sagalla caecilian has a slender body, perfect for burrowing. Its skin is extremely pigmented, lending it a brownish color with a pinkish-red hint, and white cross segments that give the appearance of grooves. They can grow up to 12 inches in length. Along with tough skin and a bony head, the...

ringed caecilian
2014-01-28 11:21:49

The Ringed caecilian (Siphonops annulatus) is an amphibian species and a member of the Caeciliidae family. The species is native to South America, ranging Argentina, Volivia, Columbia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. The Ringed caelilian inhabits tropical or subtropical areas. Lowland forests, savannah, shrubland, grassland, pastureland, plantations and rural gardens are all habitats the species may occupy. The Ringed caecilian is known to...

Mexican burrowing caecilian
2014-01-28 10:29:33

The Mexican burrowing caecilian (Dermophis mexicanus) is an amphibian species from the family Dermophiidae. The Mexican burrowing caecilian is known to inhabit Mexico, Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and also in some secluded areas of the Pacific Slope. It tends to prefer habitats in subtropical or tropical dry forests, moist lowland forests, plantations, moist mountain forests, and rural gardens. It lives and spends most of its time burrowed in loose damp soil and under logs,...

Common Mud puppy
2014-01-28 09:30:07

The Common mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus) is a species of salamander. A member of the Proteidae family, this aquatic amphibian is native to eastern North America. The Common mudpuppy can be found in lakes, rivers and ponds. During the daytime the mudpuppy will bury itself under rocks and logs. The salamander often only becomes active at night when it leaves cover to feed. Orange-brown/rust coloration covers the body of the Common mudpuppy. Bluish-black spots appear on its head and back....

Chinese Fire Belly Newt, Cynops orientalis
2013-10-07 13:41:26

The Chinese Fire Belly Newt (Cynops orientalis) is a small black newt measuring about 2.2 to 4 inches. It has bright orange aposematic coloration on the ventral sides. C. orientalis is commonly seen in pet stores where it is frequently confused with the Japanese Fire Belly Newt (C. pyrrhogaster) because of similarities in size and in coloration. It typically exhibits smoother skin and a rounder tail than the C. pyrrhogaster, and has less obvious parotoid glands. They are mildly poisonous...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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