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Latest Amphibian Stories

2009-07-28 11:15:00

For the first time in nearly 50 years, a population of a nearly extinct frog has been rediscovered in the San Bernardino National Forest's San Jacinto Wilderness. Biologists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessing suitability of sites to re-establish frogs and scientists from the San Diego Natural History Museum retracing a 1908 natural history expedition both rediscovered the rare mountain yellow-legged frog in the San Jacinto Wilderness near Idyllwild, Calif.This re-discovery...

2009-07-27 11:11:41

Dr Amber Teacher, studying a post-doctorate at Royal Holloway, University of London, has discovered evidence that a disease may be causing a behavioral change in frogs. The research, published in the August edition of Molecular Ecology, has unearthed a surprising fact about our long-tongued friends: wild frogs in the UK may be changing their mating behavior.Dr Teacher conducted her research with colleagues from the Institute of Zoology and Queen Mary, University of London. The research...

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2009-07-13 12:05:00

When it comes to mating, timing is everything for amphibians. Researchers have found that the mating activity of amphibians is synchronized by the full Moon. The fascinating fact that frogs, toads and newts across the globe seem to enjoy mating by moonlight has never before been noticed. It appears that in order to make sure that a sufficient number of males and females join up at the same time, they use the lunar cycle to co-ordinate their gatherings. This proves to be an ingenious...

2009-07-05 22:30:53

California tiger salamanders face a threat from a hybrid relative as well as from over development and pollution, researchers said. Very little development threatened the amphibians 60 years ago when commercial bait sellers in California imported barred tiger salamanders from Texas, a biologist from the University of California Davis told the San Francisco Chronicle. Maureen Ryan of the Center for Population Biology at UC Davis said the larvae of the new salamanders was popular bait, but the...

2009-05-22 14:39:27

Pollution, climate change, invasive species and habitat destruction are killing Europe's native reptiles and amphibians, wildlife experts said. Fifty-nine percent of all European amphibians and 42 percent of reptiles are declining and face even greater risk than European mammals and birds, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature said. In all, 23 percent of Europe's amphibian species and 21 percent of its reptile species have been classified as threatened and added to the...

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2009-05-06 14:26:40

Scientists in Madagascar have discovered more than 200 new species of frogs, but a political crisis is hurting conservation of the Indian Ocean island's unique wildlife, Reuters reported. Researchers said the recent discovery almost doubles the number of known amphibians in Madagascar and suggests conservationists have over-estimated the natural riches that have helped spawn a $390-million-a-year tourism industry. But newer gains in conservation have been compromised after months of...

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2009-04-07 13:17:24

Bait shop trade likely source of pathogen spread in salamanders Waterdogs, they're called, these larvae of tiger salamanders used as live bait for freshwater fishing. With tiger salamander larvae, anglers hope to catch largemouth bass, channel catfish and other freshwater fishes. They may be in for more than they bargained for: salamanders in bait shops in Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico are infected with ranaviruses, and those in Arizona, with a chytrid fungus called Batrachochytrium...

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2009-04-02 11:40:00

A group of wildlife charities are asking for volunteers to carry out a national "stock-take" of the reptiles and amphibians found in the UK's gardens, BBC News reported.The British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) and Froglife and the Herpetological Conservation Trust (HCT) have formed a coalition called Reptiles and Amphibians in your Garden. They're hoping the survey will unite large groups of amateur wildlife watchers including birdwatchers, gardeners, hands-on conservation volunteers and the...

2009-04-01 13:57:50

New evidence suggests that both acquired and innate immunity play a role in fighting off the fungal disease that is leading to dramatic declines in amphibian populations worldwide Amphibian populations are declining worldwide, principally because of the spread of the fungal disease chytridiomycosis. Researchers know that some amphibian populations and species are innately more susceptible to the disease than others. Recent preliminary evidence, described in the April issue of BioScience,...

2009-03-20 23:39:51

Japanese researchers say they've used CT scans to see the eggs inside a coelacanth, a prehistoric fish that was once considered extinct. The Tokyo Institute of Technology said the ancient species is of great interest because it is thought to represent an early step in the evolution of fish to amphibians, Kyodo News Service reported Friday. The eggs hatch while still inside the female and grow to nearly 12 inches before they emerge. Two coelacanths were captured off the coast of Tanzania and...


Latest Amphibian Reference Libraries

Caecilian
2014-01-28 12:32:06

The Sagalla caecilian (Boulengerula niedini) is a long, earthworm-like amphibian from the family Caeciliidae. The species is native to the tiny area of south-eastern Kenya called Sagalla Hill. The Sagalla caecilian has a slender body, perfect for burrowing. Its skin is extremely pigmented, lending it a brownish color with a pinkish-red hint, and white cross segments that give the appearance of grooves. They can grow up to 12 inches in length. Along with tough skin and a bony head, the...

ringed caecilian
2014-01-28 11:21:49

The Ringed caecilian (Siphonops annulatus) is an amphibian species and a member of the Caeciliidae family. The species is native to South America, ranging Argentina, Volivia, Columbia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. The Ringed caelilian inhabits tropical or subtropical areas. Lowland forests, savannah, shrubland, grassland, pastureland, plantations and rural gardens are all habitats the species may occupy. The Ringed caecilian is known to...

Mexican burrowing caecilian
2014-01-28 10:29:33

The Mexican burrowing caecilian (Dermophis mexicanus) is an amphibian species from the family Dermophiidae. The Mexican burrowing caecilian is known to inhabit Mexico, Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and also in some secluded areas of the Pacific Slope. It tends to prefer habitats in subtropical or tropical dry forests, moist lowland forests, plantations, moist mountain forests, and rural gardens. It lives and spends most of its time burrowed in loose damp soil and under logs,...

Common Mud puppy
2014-01-28 09:30:07

The Common mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus) is a species of salamander. A member of the Proteidae family, this aquatic amphibian is native to eastern North America. The Common mudpuppy can be found in lakes, rivers and ponds. During the daytime the mudpuppy will bury itself under rocks and logs. The salamander often only becomes active at night when it leaves cover to feed. Orange-brown/rust coloration covers the body of the Common mudpuppy. Bluish-black spots appear on its head and back....

Chinese Fire Belly Newt, Cynops orientalis
2013-10-07 13:41:26

The Chinese Fire Belly Newt (Cynops orientalis) is a small black newt measuring about 2.2 to 4 inches. It has bright orange aposematic coloration on the ventral sides. C. orientalis is commonly seen in pet stores where it is frequently confused with the Japanese Fire Belly Newt (C. pyrrhogaster) because of similarities in size and in coloration. It typically exhibits smoother skin and a rounder tail than the C. pyrrhogaster, and has less obvious parotoid glands. They are mildly poisonous...

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Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.