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Latest Amphibian Stories

2009-04-01 13:57:50

New evidence suggests that both acquired and innate immunity play a role in fighting off the fungal disease that is leading to dramatic declines in amphibian populations worldwide Amphibian populations are declining worldwide, principally because of the spread of the fungal disease chytridiomycosis. Researchers know that some amphibian populations and species are innately more susceptible to the disease than others. Recent preliminary evidence, described in the April issue of BioScience,...

2009-03-20 23:39:51

Japanese researchers say they've used CT scans to see the eggs inside a coelacanth, a prehistoric fish that was once considered extinct. The Tokyo Institute of Technology said the ancient species is of great interest because it is thought to represent an early step in the evolution of fish to amphibians, Kyodo News Service reported Friday. The eggs hatch while still inside the female and grow to nearly 12 inches before they emerge. Two coelacanths were captured off the coast of Tanzania and...

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2009-02-02 13:40:00

 Scientists today announced the discovery of 10 amphibians believed to be new to science, including a spiky-skinned, orange-legged rain frog, three poison dart frogs and three glass frogs, so called because their transparent skin can reveal internal organs.The species were discovered during a recent Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) expedition in Colombia's mountainous Tacarcuna area of the Darien, near the border with Panama. The expedition was led by herpetologists from Conservation...

2009-01-22 10:16:12

An Australian scientist says an international study suggests human consumption of frog legs is now threatening the amphibians' extinction. University of Adelaide Associate Professor Corey Bradshaw said the global pattern of harvesting and the decline of wild populations of frogs appears to be following the same path set by overexploitation of the seas and the subsequent chain reaction of fisheries collapsing around the world. Frogs legs are on the menu at school cafeterias in Europe, market...

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2008-10-30 13:04:29

Although research has linked inbreeding with elevated rates of deformity in a wide variety of animals, a new study finds it plays no part in the high incidence of malformation among salamanders. Purdue University researchers recently examined 2,000 adult and juvenile salamanders and found that 8 percent had visible deformities, mainly consisting of missing, extra or dwarfed digits (equivalent to fingers and toes). That is double the rate of malformation found in newts, a related amphibian,...

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2008-10-29 09:25:00

Biologists have long suspected that amphibians, whose moist permeable skins make them susceptible to slight changes in the environment, might be good bellwethers for impending alterations in biodiversity during rapid climate change. Now two University of California biologists have verified the predictive power of this sensitive group of animals in a global study of species turnover among amphibians and birds. The study appears this week in the advance online version of the journal Proceedings...

2008-10-06 18:00:19

A U.S. study suggests the common insecticide malathion can decimate tadpole populations, killing them indirectly at doses too small to kill them directly. University of Pittsburgh researchers wanted to determine the environmental impact of the use of malathion -- the most popular insecticide in the United States. The scientists discovered gradual amounts of malathion that were too small to directly kill developing leopard frog tadpoles instead sparked a biological chain of events that...

2008-10-01 15:00:27

IN SHORT What: Life In Cold Blood Where: Prime When: 8.35pm, Sunday -------------------- SIR David Attenborough presents the final chapter of his epic overview of life on Earth as he transforms perceptions of cold- blooded animals in Life in Cold Blood. "Reptiles and amphibians are sometimes thought of as slow, dim- witted and primitive," says Sir David. "In fact, they can be lethally fast, spectacularly beautiful, surprisingly affectionate and extremely sophisticated." Sir...

2008-09-26 21:00:17

Amphibians across the world are at risk of extinction as a result of climate change, habitat destruction and disease, according to the Zoological Society of London (ZSL).At a lecture at London Zoo, ZSL research fellow Dr Trent Garner warned that species in Britain such as the common toad were among those increasingly under threat.He said a recent study showed warmer winter temperatures in southern England were affecting the hibernation of toads, who would normally slow their physiology down...

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2008-09-01 16:40:00

Scientists from Manchester University and Chester Zoo have ventured into Costa Rica with hopes of finding some of the world's most endangered frogs. Their journey will take them deep into the forests of Monteverde where they will be on the lookout for the rare amphibians, including the golden toad, last seen about 20 years ago. "Costa Rica's highlands used to be major biodiversity hotspots - but in many areas, amphibian populations have been completely decimated," said team leader Andrew...


Latest Amphibian Reference Libraries

Mindanao Horned Frog, Megophrys stejnegeri
2014-08-21 10:47:27

The Mindanao horned frog, also known as the Southeast Asian horned toad, is native to the Philippines and found only on the island of Mindanao. The habitat of this frog is tropical and subtropical moist forests, near ponds and rivers. The Mindanao horned frog can be found in elevations up to 1.5 miles as long as it has an ample water supply for breeding. The Mindanao horned frog has a large head and mouth in comparison to the body. It also has pointed horn-like humps sticking out above the...

Caecilian
2014-01-28 12:32:06

The Sagalla caecilian (Boulengerula niedini) is a long, earthworm-like amphibian from the family Caeciliidae. The species is native to the tiny area of south-eastern Kenya called Sagalla Hill. The Sagalla caecilian has a slender body, perfect for burrowing. Its skin is extremely pigmented, lending it a brownish color with a pinkish-red hint, and white cross segments that give the appearance of grooves. They can grow up to 12 inches in length. Along with tough skin and a bony head, the...

ringed caecilian
2014-01-28 11:21:49

The Ringed caecilian (Siphonops annulatus) is an amphibian species and a member of the Caeciliidae family. The species is native to South America, ranging Argentina, Volivia, Columbia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. The Ringed caelilian inhabits tropical or subtropical areas. Lowland forests, savannah, shrubland, grassland, pastureland, plantations and rural gardens are all habitats the species may occupy. The Ringed caecilian is known to...

Mexican burrowing caecilian
2014-01-28 10:29:33

The Mexican burrowing caecilian (Dermophis mexicanus) is an amphibian species from the family Dermophiidae. The Mexican burrowing caecilian is known to inhabit Mexico, Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and also in some secluded areas of the Pacific Slope. It tends to prefer habitats in subtropical or tropical dry forests, moist lowland forests, plantations, moist mountain forests, and rural gardens. It lives and spends most of its time burrowed in loose damp soil and under logs,...

Common Mud puppy
2014-01-28 09:30:07

The Common mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus) is a species of salamander. A member of the Proteidae family, this aquatic amphibian is native to eastern North America. The Common mudpuppy can be found in lakes, rivers and ponds. During the daytime the mudpuppy will bury itself under rocks and logs. The salamander often only becomes active at night when it leaves cover to feed. Orange-brown/rust coloration covers the body of the Common mudpuppy. Bluish-black spots appear on its head and back....

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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