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Latest Amphistium Stories

Mystery Of The Flatfish Head Solved
2012-06-25 16:50:25

Those delicious flatfishes, like halibut and sole, are also evolutionary puzzles. Their profoundly asymmetrical heads have one of the most unusual body plans among all backboned animals (vertebrates) but the evolution of their bizarre anatomy has long been a mystery. How did flatfishes, with both of their eyes on one side of their head, evolve? So puzzling was the anatomy of flounders and their kin that they were used in early arguments against Darwin and his theory of natural selection....

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2008-07-11 00:15:00

A researcher from the University of Chicago said newly identified fish fossils discovered in several European museums might resolve a long-standing question about evolutionary theory. The 50 million-year-old fossils fill in a "missing link" in the evolution of flatfishes and explain one of nature's most extraordinary phenomena, namely how flatfish such as sole, flounder halibut developed the bizarre but useful trait of having both eyes on one side of their head. Even more extraordinary is the...

2008-07-11 09:00:18

By WILLIAM MULLEN By William Mullen Chicago Tribune CHICAGO Some dusty fossil fish spotted by a sharp-eyed University of Chicago doctoral student as he rummaged through forgotten corners of museum collections in Europe have solved a question that has long vexed scientists. The puzzling question was: How did flatfish, a bizarre, highly specialized group of bottom-feeding fish - sole, plaice, turbot, flounder and halibut among them - end up with both of their eyes on one side of their...

2008-07-10 09:00:00

By William Mullen, Chicago Tribune Jul. 10--Some dusty fish fossils spotted by a sharp-eyed University of Chicago doctoral student as he rummaged through forgotten corners of museum collections in Europe have answered a question that has long vexed scientists. The puzzling question was: How did flatfish, a bizarre, highly specialized group of bottom-feeding fish that are some of nature's most delicious creatures--sole, plaice, turbot, flounder and halibut among them--end up with both of...

2008-07-10 00:00:09

CHICAGO _ Some dusty fossil fish spotted by a sharp-eyed University of Chicago doctoral student as he rummaged through forgotten corners of museum collections in Europe have solved a question that has long vexed scientists. The puzzling question was: How did flatfish, a bizarre, highly specialized group of bottom-feeding fish that are some of nature's most delicious creatures _ sole, plaice, turbot, flounder and halibut among them _ end up with both of their eyes on one side of their faces?...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.