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Latest Ampullariidae Stories

2008-08-08 12:00:24

U.S. scientists say the New Zealand mud snail, long a problem in western states, has spread across four U.S. Great Lakes and is altering the lakes' ecology. Pennsylvania State University scientists said the tiny snails out-compete native snails and insects but aren't good fish food replacements for the native species. "These snails have an operculum, a door that closes the shell," said Associate Professor Edward Levri at the university's Altoona, Pa., campus. "They can be out of the water...

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2008-07-15 09:10:00

MIAMI -- It's never a good sign when an animal disappears from the place that gave it its name. That's what is happening to the Everglades snail kite, an endangered hawk whose numbers are in sickening free fall from the compounded impacts of back-to-back droughts and a long-controversial water management scheme intended to protect another equally at-risk bird. Though biologists have not yet wrapped up the latest annual count, they've already seen enough to know the kite has dropped to...

2008-07-06 15:00:14

By Curtis Morgan, The Miami Herald Jul. 6--It's never a good sign when an animal disappears from the place that gave it its name. That's what is happening to the Everglades snail kite, an endangered hawk whose numbers are in free fall from the compounded impacts of back-to-back droughts and a long-controversial water management scheme intended to protect another equally at-risk bird. Though biologists have not yet wrapped up the latest annual count, they have already seen enough to...

2008-07-06 00:00:12

A measure taken to protect one endangered bird in the Florida Everglades, the Cape Sable seaside sparrow, may be driving the Everglades snail kite out. The most recent survey of the kites found few of them living in the Everglades or Lake Okeechobee, the source of the River of Grass, The Miami Herald reported. Most of the nesting pairs spotted were 100 miles to the north in a chain of lakes in central Florida. The counters said numbers may have dropped by two-thirds since 2000 to fewer...

2008-07-05 18:00:11

By Curtis Morgan, The Miami Herald Jul. 5--It's never a good sign when an animal disappears from the place that gave it its name. That's what is happening to the Everglades snail kite, an endangered hawk whose numbers are in sickening free fall from the compounded impacts of back-to-back droughts and a long-controversial water management scheme intended to protect another equally at-risk bird. Though biologists have not yet wrapped up the latest annual count, they've already seen...


Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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