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Latest Amygdala Stories

Our Brains Can Judge A Face's Trustworthiness Even When We Can't See It
2014-08-07 03:47:28

New York University Our brains are able to judge the trustworthiness of a face even when we cannot consciously see it, a team of scientists has found. Their findings, which appear in the Journal of Neuroscience, shed new light on how we form snap judgments of others. "Our findings suggest that the brain automatically responds to a face's trustworthiness before it is even consciously perceived," explains Jonathan Freeman, an assistant professor in New York University's Department of...

2014-08-04 09:45:12

Duke University Epigenetic control of serotonin transporter makes difference The tiny addition of a chemical mark atop a gene that is well known for its involvement in clinical depression and posttraumatic stress disorder can affect the way a person's brain responds to threats, according to a new study by Duke University researchers. The results, which appear online August 3 in Nature Neuroscience, go beyond genetics to help explain why some individuals may be more vulnerable than...

2014-08-04 09:42:54

Vanderbilt University Issues of crime and punishment, vengeance and justice date back to the dawn of human history, but it is only in the last few years that scientists have begun exploring the basic nature of the complex neural processes in the brain that underlie these fundamental behaviors. Now a new brain imaging study – published online Aug. 3 by the journal Nature Neuroscience – has identified the brain mechanisms that underlie our judgment of how severely a person who has...

stress and mental illness
2014-08-02 05:31:14

Rayshell Clapper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online People suffer from stress under a litany of situations. Some situations are temporarily stressful and then dissipate while others lead to long-term psychological problems including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It seems that more people these days suffer from the consequences of stress, which leads to many studies about the mental illness. In one study completed by Duke University, the study's senior author Dr. Kafui...

2014-07-01 11:43:59

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Cedars-Sinai-led investigators say some brain cells in a structure called the amygdala appear to make judgments based on a viewer's subjective opinions instead of true emotion expressed When evaluating another person's emotions – happy, sad, angry, afraid – humans take cues from facial expressions. Neurons in a part of the brain called the amygdala "fire" in response to the visual stimulation as information is processed by the retina, the amygdala and a...

2014-06-28 09:57:22

University of Illinois Patients with persistent ringing in the ears – a condition known as tinnitus – process emotions differently in the brain from those with normal hearing, researchers report in the journal Brain Research. Tinnitus afflicts 50 million people in the United States, according to the American Tinnitus Association, and causes those with the condition to hear noises that aren’t really there. These phantom sounds are not speech, but rather whooshing noises, train...

child stress
2014-06-28 05:41:36

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Chronic stressors such as poverty or abuse can have a lasting negative impact on children and could be linked to behavioral, health or employment-related problems later on in life, according to new research appearing in the latest edition of the journal Biological Psychiatry. While experiencing a certain amount of stress can help youngsters learn how to adapt to and cope with life’s obstacles, researchers from the University of...

2014-04-01 13:22:59

Brain disconnect leaves teen brain less able to judge trustworthiness Making a snap decision usually means following your initial reaction -- going with your gut. That intuitive feeling sprouts from the limbic system, the evolutionarily older and simpler part of the brain that affects emotion, behavior and motivation. But during adolescence, the limbic system connects and communicates with the rest of the brain differently than it does during adulthood, leaving many adolescents...

emotions in the brain
2014-03-06 04:56:45

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study on the brains of mustached bats could provide a window into our own cognitive processes, according to a report published in the journal Frontiers in Physiology on Tuesday. In the study, a pair of Georgetown University researchers found that a small region within the bats’ brains called the amygdala, a structure in the brains of all mammals, controls the production of emotionally-specific calls and sounds. The team said...


Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.