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Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 9:29 EDT

Latest Amygdala Stories

2010-01-27 16:26:15

A new study demonstrates that cooperation between the hippocampus, best known for its critical role in learning and memory, and a principal downstream cortical target modulates anxiety-related behaviors in mice. The research, published by Cell Press in the January 28th issue of the journal Neuron, provides intriguing insight into how anxiety is processed in the brain and may help to explain what governs anxiety-related behaviors. Recent research has linked a specific region of the...

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2010-01-27 14:41:56

Draw a map of the brain when fear and anxiety are involved, and the amygdala"”the brain's almond-shaped center for panic and fight-or-flight responses"”looms large. But the amygdala doesn't do its job alone. Scientists at Emory University have recently built upon work from others, extending the fear map to part of the brain known as the prelimbic cortex. Researchers led by Kerry Ressler, MD, PhD, found that mice lacking a critical growth factor in the prelimbic cortex have trouble...

2009-11-25 15:07:08

The portion of our brains that is responsible for registering fear and even panic has a built-in chemical sensor that is triggered by a primordial terror "“ suffocation. A report in the November 25th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication, shows in studies of mice that the rise in acid levels in the brain upon breathing carbon dioxide triggers acid-sensing channels that evoke fear behavior. In addition to the insight into the normal fear response, the discovery may help to...

2009-11-25 14:50:32

Breathing carbon dioxide can trigger panic attacks, but the biological reason for this effect has not been understood. A new study by University of Iowa researchers shows that carbon dioxide increases brain acidity, which in turn activates a brain protein that plays an important role in fear and anxiety behavior. The study, published in the Nov. 25 issue of the journal Cell, offers new possibilities for understanding the biological basis of panic and anxiety disorders in general and may...

2009-11-17 14:01:31

Parents have long suspected that the brains of their teenagers function differently than those of adults. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, we have begun to appreciate how the brain continues to develop structurally through adolescence and on into adulthood. High emotionality is a characteristic of adolescents and researchers are trying to understand how "Ëœemotional areas' of the brain differ between adults and adolescents.Scientists from the National Institute...

2009-10-26 22:35:28

Mother-child attachments in animals and possible parallels in people When do you first leave the nest? Early in development infants of many species experience important transitions"”such as learning when to leave the protective presence of their mother to start exploring the wider world. Neuroscientists have now pinpointed molecular events occurring in the brain during that turning point. Based on animal studies, the findings may shed light on the strength of attachments in many...

2009-10-21 13:02:16

Researchers have discovered that a primitive region of the brain responsible for sensorimotor control also has an important role in regulating emotional responses to threatening situations. This region appears to work in concert with another structure called the amygdala to regulate social and emotional behavior. Georgetown University Medical Center researchers have recently discovered that activation of a primitive brain region, the deep layers of superior colliculus (DLSC), elicits...

2009-09-16 06:51:43

TAU brain scientist says findings could lead to new neurological treatments The power of the imagination is well-known: it's no surprise that scary music is scarier with your eyes closed. But now neuroscientist and psychiatrist Prof. Talma Hendler of Tel Aviv University's Functional Brain Center says that this phenomenon may open the door to a new way of treating people with Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurological diseases. In her new study, Prof. Hendler found that the simple act of...

2009-09-09 13:55:09

U.S. scientists say they have determined two different brain circuits might control the motivation to seek food and then consume it. University of Missouri researchers using laboratory rats said they discovered deactivating the basolateral amygdala -- a brain region involved in regulating emotion -- specifically blocked consumption of a fatty diet. Surprisingly, it had no effect on the rats wanting to repeatedly look for food. It appears that two different brain circuits control the...

2009-09-08 15:40:42

Scientists led a rat to the fatty food, but they couldn't make it eat.  Using an animal model of binge eating, University of Missouri researchers discovered that deactivating the basolateral amygdala, a brain region involved in regulating emotion, specifically blocked consumption of a fatty diet. Surprisingly, it had no effect on the rat wanting to look for the food repeatedly. "It appears that two different brain circuits control the motivation to seek and consume," said Matthew Will,...