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Latest Amygdala Stories

Anxiety And Social Phobias Made Worse By Missing 'Brake' In The Brain
2013-12-05 05:20:13

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A team led by researchers from the Medical University of Vienna has discovered one possible source of anxiety disorders and severe phobias – a missing inhibitory connection or “brake” in the brain. When experienced at a manageable level, fear can make people alert and help protect them against danger, it can also disrupt an individual’s sensory perception and reduce happiness when it becomes disproportionate. Now the...

Brain Changes Could Help Predict Anxiety Disorders In Young Children
2013-11-20 07:32:26

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Measuring the size and connectivity of a region of the brain responsible for processing emotions can help predict the amount of stress that young children are experiencing in their day-to-day lives, according to new research published today in the journal Biological Psychiatry. In the study, researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine report that kids who have a larger amygdala that is better connected with other parts...

2013-11-11 21:24:32

Scientists investigate promising new target areas for treatment Research released today reveals new mechanisms and areas of the brain associated with anxiety and depression, presenting possible targets to understand and treat these debilitating mental illnesses. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2013, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. More than 350 million people worldwide suffer...

Science Could Determine If Bad Kids Will Become Adult Criminals
2013-11-05 10:24:39

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Psychologists from the University of Michigan say they’ve developed a new, hi-tech way to neurologically pinpoint trouble-making children. Recent advancements in the field of neurogenetics are helping researchers find the origins of certain neurological disorders and functions and, according to the latest study, the propensity for poor behavior can be identified in the brain. This, say the researchers, could allow parents to...

Opioids In The Brain Ease Social Pain
2013-10-11 04:48:35

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While previous research has shown that our brains release pain-killing opioids when the body experiences physical harm, a new study in the journal Molecular Psychiatry has revealed that this system is also activated by social pain. The study researchers also discovered that those who score high on a personality attribute called resilience, or the capacity to cope with environmental change, showed the highest level of natural painkiller...

2013-10-07 13:48:49

This press release is in support of a presentation by Professor Inger Sundstroem Poromaa on Monday Oct. 7 at the 26th ECNP Congress in Barcelona, Spain Improved understanding of the role of female sex hormones on the drivers and symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) may shed light on the complex interactions between sex hormones and mood, potentially helping to explain the increased prevalence of mood disorders in women. Most women are unaffected by the hormonal changes of...

Brain Circuitry Binge Eating
2013-09-27 08:27:03

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers at University of North Carolina have identified a part of the brain that may play a critical role in eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia. The scientists were able to pinpoint the precise cellular connections responsible for triggering this behavior, something that could give insight into a potential cause of obesity and perhaps lead to better treatments for anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder – the...

2013-07-02 11:15:23

A key brain structure that regulates emotions works differently in preschoolers with depression compared with their healthy peers, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The differences, measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), provide the earliest evidence yet of changes in brain function in young children with depression. The researchers say the findings could lead to ways to identify and treat depressed children earlier in...

2013-07-01 15:07:21

Anyone who's ever heard a Beethoven sonata or a Beatles song knows how powerfully sound can affect our emotions. But it can work the other way as well – our emotions can actually affect how we hear and process sound. When certain types of sounds become associated in our brains with strong emotions, hearing similar sounds can evoke those same feelings, even far removed from their original context. It's a phenomenon commonly seen in combat veterans suffering from...

Researchers Don't Ask How You Feel, They Use Brain Activity Instead
2013-06-20 14:48:33

[ Watch the Video: Identifying Emotions Using Brain Activity ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Instead of asking someone how they feel, a group of researchers at Carnegie Mellon has found a way to identify a person's emotion based on brain activity, according to a new report in the journal PLoS ONE. Previous efforts to view emotions through brain imaging have been hampered by study participants' reluctance to report emotion or emotional responses that are not...


Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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