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Latest Amygdala Stories

2012-11-09 11:10:26

Researchers supported by the Wellcome Trust have discovered that we use a different part of our brain to learn about social hierarchies than we do to learn ordinary information. The study provides clues as to how this information is stored in memory and also reveals that you can tell a lot about how good somebody is likely to be at judging social rank by looking at the structure of their brain. Primates (and people) are remarkably good at ranking each other within social hierarchies, a...

Most Annoying Sound Ever
2012-10-13 09:14:36

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online There are noises that set our teeth on edge, make us recoil, and generally unnerve us. For me, that noise is the sound of someone popping his or her back. Scientists from Newcastle University and the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging say heightened activity between the emotional and auditory areas of the brain can explain why the sound of chalk on a blackboard, a knife on a bottle, or a joint popping is so unpleasant. A new...

Forget About Fear
2012-09-21 04:44:51

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Emotional memories can be erased shortly after they are formed through behavioral intervention alone, without the aid of medications, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Science. The breakthrough offers a major step forward in understanding where fearful memories are processed in the brain, and how to permanently erase them. The research could be particularly helpful for people suffering from conditions such...

2012-09-14 15:29:39

Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute have found new links between a protein that controls our urge to eat and brain cells involved in the development of alcoholism. The discovery points to new possibilities for designing drugs to treat alcoholism and other addictions. The new study, published online ahead of print by the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, focuses on the peptide ghrelin, which is known to stimulate eating. “This is the first study to characterize the effects...

Crows Are Smart Than You Think!
2012-09-11 14:29:14

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online If crows ever freaked you out before, then you´re in for a whole new set of chill bumps. New research indicates that crows are able to recognize faces and associate them with feelings. Scientists writing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences said that crows have human-like ways of attaching negative and positive emotions to particular faces. “The regions of the crow brain that work together are not unlike...

Emotion To Vividness Of Perception Linked To Creation Of Vivid Memories
2012-08-20 13:41:57

Have you ever wondered why you can remember things from long ago as if they happened yesterday, yet sometimes can't recall what you ate for dinner last night? According to a new study led by psychologists at the University of Toronto, it's because how much something means to you actually influences how you see it as well as how vividly you can recall it later. "We've discovered that we see things that are emotionally arousing with greater clarity than those that are more mundane," says...

2012-07-06 10:25:40

Researchers decode a molecular mechanism that sheds light on how trauma can become engraved in the brain Feelings of anxiety very effectively prevent people from getting into situations that are too dangerous. Those who have had a terrible experience initially tend to avoid the place of tragedy out of fear. If no other oppressive situation arises, normally the symptoms of fear gradually subside. "The memory of the terrible events is not just erased." states first author, PD Dr. Andras...

2012-06-12 11:16:35

Mildly stressful situations can affect our perceptions in the same way as life-threatening ones Financial loss can lead to irrational behavior. Now, research by Weizmann Institute scientists reveals that the effects of loss go even deeper: Loss can compromise our early perception and interfere with our grasp of the true situation. The findings, which recently appeared in the Journal of Neuroscience, may also have implications for our understanding of the neurological mechanisms underlying...

2012-06-12 10:25:32

Experimental drug and genetic difference both indicate how people deal with fear and stress Researchers at Duke University and the National Institutes of Health have found a way to calm the fears of anxious mice with a drug that alters their brain chemistry. They've also found that human genetic differences related to the same brain chemistry influence how well people cope with fear and stress. It's an advance in understanding the brain's fear circuitry that the research team says may...

2012-05-18 02:14:41

The baseline level of distrust is distinct and separable from our inborn lie detector Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on my parahippocampal gyrus. Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have found that suspicion resides in two distinct regions of the brain: the amygdala, which plays a central role in processing fear and emotional memories, and the parahippocampal gyrus, which is associated with declarative memory and the recognition of scenes....


Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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