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Latest Amygdala Stories

2011-08-15 22:34:36

MRI scans show their children have an enlarged amygdala Researchers think that brains are sensitive to the quality of child care, according to a study that was directed by Dr. Sonia Lupien and her colleagues from the University of Montreal published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The scientists worked with ten year old children whose mothers exhibited symptoms of depression throughout their lives, and discovered that the children's amygdala, a part of the brain...

2011-07-12 12:43:07

Researchers from the University of Bonn find decrease in activity of the brain's 'fear center' The study, which was supported by the German Research Foundation, brought together scientists from the Universities of Bonn and Köln, as well as from the Charit© in Berlin. 28 younger persons who had been smoking for quite a number of years and an equal number of non-smokers participated in this study. Each of the subjects was shown photos of happy, fearful and neutral faces while their...

2011-06-30 19:25:48

How easy is it to falsify memory? New research at the Weizmann Institute shows that a bit of social pressure may be all that is needed. The study reveals a unique pattern of brain activity when false memories are formed "“ one that hints at a surprising connection between our social selves and memory. The experiment, conducted by Prof. Yadin Dudai and research student Micah Edelson of the Institute's Neurobiology Department with Prof. Raymond Dolan and Dr. Tali Sharot of University...

2011-06-20 13:40:47

Picture a menacing drill sergeant, a gory slaughterhouse, a devastating scene of a natural disaster. Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have found that viewing such emotion-laden images immediately after taking a test actually enhances people's retention of the tested material. The data the researchers gathered in recent studies are the first to show that negative arousal following successful retrieval of information enhances later recall of that information. The finding is...

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2011-06-04 15:55:00

Research shows morally laden scenarios get different responses from people of different ages.Moral responses change as people age says a new study from the University of Chicago.Both preschool children and adults distinguish between damage done either intentionally or accidently when assessing whether a perpetrator has done something wrong, said study author Jean Decety. But, adults are much less likely than children to think someone should be punished for damaging an object, for example,...

2011-05-16 20:50:04

    * Individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) have numerous motor, behavioral, and cognitive difficulties.    * Deep gray matter, the brain's "relay" stations, may be key to understanding alcohol-related brain injuries.    * Recent findings show significant volume reductions in deep gray matter structures of those with FASD. Individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) have numerous motor, behavioral, and cognitive...

2011-05-04 15:03:20

A new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that the brain has built-in mechanisms that trigger an automatic reaction to someone who refuses to share. The reaction derives from the amygdala, an older part of the brain. The subjects' sense of justice was challenged in a two-player money-based fairness game, while their brain activity was registered by an MR scanner. When bidders made unfair suggestions as to how to share the money, they were often punished by their partners even if...

2011-05-03 14:36:44

Study of jazz musicians reveals how the brain processes improvisations A pianist is playing an unknown melody freely without reading from a musical score. How does the listener's brain recognize if this melody is improvised or if it is memorized? Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig investigated jazz musicians to discover which brain areas are especially sensitive to features of improvised behavior. Among these are the amygdala and a...

2011-05-02 23:35:21

Nurses who care for patients with dementia now have a tailored approach to dental hygiene for their charges, thanks to a pilot study by a team of nurses. "Poor oral health can lead to pneumonia and cardiovascular disease as well as periodontal disease," said Rita A. Jablonski, even though these illnesses are not usually associated with the mouth. According to Jablonski, assistant professor of nursing, Penn State, persons with dementia resist care when they feel threatened. In general, these...

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2011-04-21 10:45:01

Breakthrough study offers hope for targeted treatment of stress-related disorders A team of neuroscientists at the University of Leicester, UK, in collaboration with researchers from Poland and Japan, has announced a breakthrough in the understanding of the 'brain chemistry' that triggers our response to highly stressful and traumatic events. The discovery of a critical and previously unknown pathway in the brain that is linked to our response to stress was announced April 20 in the journal...


Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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