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Latest Amygdala Stories

2010-11-15 13:04:53

Patients who express fear when happy faces are viewed on a screen inside fMRI scanner were found not to respond to cognitive behavioral therapy A brain scan with functional MRI (fMRI) is enough to predict which patients with pediatric anxiety disorder will respond to "talk therapy," and so may not need to use psychiatric medication, say neuroscientists from Georgetown University Medical Center. Their study, being presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in San Diego,...

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2010-11-11 11:02:25

Neurobiologists at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research have identified, for the first time, clearly defined neural circuits responsible for the processing of fear states. These findings could ultimately help people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety disorders. The scientists' results have been published in the latest issue of Nature. Fear arises in the almond-shaped brain structure known as the amygdala. It is the amygdala which processes the strange...

2010-11-10 17:58:44

Fear is an adaptive response, essential to the survival of many species. This behavioural adaptation may be innate but can also be a consequence of conditioning, during the course of which an animal learns that a particular stimulus precedes an unpleasant event. There is a large amount of data indicating that the amygdala, a particular structure in the brain, is strongly involved during the learning of "conditioned" fear. However, until now, the underlying neuronal circuits have remained...

2010-11-10 17:56:18

2 different neural subtypes act like a seesaw to control the level of fear output from the brain's amygdala The eerie music in the movie theater swells; the roller coaster crests and begins its descent; something goes bump in the night. Suddenly, you're scared: your heart thumps, your stomach clenches, your throat tightens, your muscles freeze you in place. But fear doesn't come from your heart, your stomach, your throat, or your muscles. Fear begins in your brain, and it is...

2010-09-28 20:09:23

In contrast, stressed women show increased brain coordination when looking at angry faces A new study by USC researchers reveals that stressed men looking at angry faces had diminished activity in the brain regions responsible for understanding others' feelings. Turns out the silent and stoic response to stress might be a guy thing after all. "These are the first findings to indicate that sex differences in the effects of stress on social behavior extend to one of the most basic social...

2010-08-31 13:39:34

The notion that cutting or burning oneself could provide relief from emotional distress is difficult to understand for most people, but it is an experience reported commonly among people who compulsively hurt themselves. Individuals with borderline personality disorder experience intense emotions and often show a deficiency of emotion regulation skills. This group of people also displays high prevalence rates of self-injurious behavior, which may help them to reduce negative emotional...

2010-08-25 15:01:14

EMBL scientists discover neural switch that controls fear Fear can make you run, it can make you fight, and it can glue you to the spot. Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Monterotondo, Italy and GlaxoSmithKline in Verona, Italy, have identified not only the part of the brain but the specific type of neurons that determine how mice react to a frightening stimulus. In a study published today in Neuron, they combined pharmaceutical and genetic approaches with...

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2010-08-12 10:05:00

By studying young monkeys, scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health believe they have found the areas of the brain that cause childhood anxiety. The study, which was published in the August 12 edition of Nature, could potentially help doctors develop new methods for detecting and treating kids at-risk for developing anxiety-related disorders, according to a press release published by the university on Wednesday. Young primates who had increased...

2010-08-03 13:49:49

UCLA research has implications for recovery from brain injuries Many neuroscientists believe the loss of the brain region known as the amygdala would result in the brain's inability to form new memories with emotional content. New UCLA research indicates this is not so and suggests that when one brain region is damaged, other regions can compensate. The research appears this week in the early online edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). "Our findings...

2010-07-13 15:55:30

New research finds that the brains of overweight people are less sensitive to feelings of hunger when responding to the smell and taste of food, compared to healthy weight individuals Research to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), the foremost society for research into all aspects of eating and drinking behavior, finds that that feelings of hunger have less influence on how the brain responds to the smell and taste of food in...


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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