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Latest Anatomically modern humans Stories

2009-08-11 13:32:05

U.S. and Canadian scientists say data from human fossils suggest a shift in animal resource exploitation as humans spread into Europe 40,000 years ago. Washington University in St. Louis Professor Erik Trinkaus and University of British Columbia Professor Michael Richards used accumulations of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope data to reach that conclusion. They said both the preceding Neanderthals and the incoming modern humans regularly and successfully hunted large game such as deer,...

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2008-09-23 14:15:00

Experts now believe Neanderthals may have enjoyed a wide range of foods and a much broader menu than had previously been supposed. Cave excavations in Gibraltar showed that they were once occupied by the ancient humans show they ate seal and dolphin when they could get hold of the animals. Evidence even indicates that mussels were warmed to open their shells. The findings contrast the popular view that Neanderthals ate a diet utterly dominated by meat from land animals. Such findings provide...

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2008-08-31 10:00:00

New evidence debunks "Ëœstupid' Neanderthal myth Research by UK and American scientists has struck another blow to the theory that Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) became extinct because they were less intelligent than our ancestors (Homo sapiens). The research team has shown that early stone tool technologies developed by our species, Homo sapiens, were no more efficient than those used by Neanderthals. Published today (26 August) in the Journal of Human Evolution, their...

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2008-08-27 12:50:00

Researchers in the US and UK have concluded that tools developed by Homo sapiens were no more sophisticated than those used by the Neanderthals. The team of researchers, whose findings appear in the Journal of Human Evolution, recreated these ancient tools and compared them to each other.Researchers studied wide stone tools called "flakes," which were used by both Neanderthals and early modern humans. Also, they studied the complexity of "blades" "“ a narrower stone tool later adopted...

2008-04-16 03:00:00

By Groves, Colin The ancestors of the miniature hominins found on the Indonesian island of Flores may have spread out of Africa even before the ancestors of modern humans. The fossil record of human evolution is extremely well-known, comparable to only a few other large mammals, such as elephants. Fifty years ago, specialists were speaking of a single main line of human evolution, progressing from Australopithecus africanus (small brain, short legs, prominent jaws) through Homo erectus to...

2007-08-09 18:03:03

Text of report by Kenyan KTN TV on 9 August Kenyan archaeologists today launched an unprecedented challenge on Charles Darwin's human evolution theory. An archaeologist Fredrick Manthi claims two fossils found around Lake Turkana indicate that man may not have evolved from an inferior human-like creature as suggested by the theory. Manthi, who has been studying the fossils for the last seven years, claims human species named homo habilis and homo erectus lived in the same location at the...

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2007-03-13 13:50:00

An international research team led by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (Leipzig, Germany) and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France) has found evidence that some of the earliest members of our species had evolved our characteristically long developmental period, and most likely our extended childhood, over 160,000 years ago. These findings are in contrast to studies that suggest that early fossil hominins possessed short growth...

2006-11-25 03:00:00

By David Charters LANGUAGE leaves no bones in the earth for the archaeologists, so we cannot tell when man first spoke. But we can stretch our imaginations back to the edge of a pond, where a young woman completes her ablutions by rubbing a pigment into her cheeks. She smiles at the reflection. "Wow", or "phew", or "mmmm", says the young chap on the far bank, not realising that his utterance changed the world. For this vocal appreciation of colour used as a beauty treatment was the most...

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2006-09-13 12:55:00

NEW YORK - Neanderthals survived for thousands of years longer than scientists thought, with small lingering bands finding refuge in a massive cave near the southern tip of Spain, new research suggests. The work contends that Neanderthals were using a cave in Gibraltar at least 2,000 years later than their presence had been firmly documented anywhere before, researchers said. "Maybe these are the last ones," said Clive Finlayson of The Gibraltar Museum, who reported the findings Wednesday...

2006-05-30 20:05:00

By Michael Roddy READING (Reuters) - It was a dark and stormy night, and in a cave in what is now southern France, Neanderthals were singing, dancing and tapping on stalagmites with their fingernails to pass the time. Did this Ice-Age rave-up happen, perhaps 50,000 to 100,000 years ago, on a cold night in the Pleistocene Epoch? Or is it purely a figment of the imagination of Steven Mithen, professor of early prehistory at the University of Reading in England? Impossible to know, Mithen, 45,...


Latest Anatomically modern humans Reference Libraries

Neanderthals
2013-10-03 16:03:35

The Neanderthals or Neandertals are an extinct species or subspecies of the genus Homo which is closely related to modern humans. They are known from fossils, dating back from the Pleistocene period, which have been found in Europe and parts of western and central Asia. The species gets its name from Neandertal, “Neander’s Valley”, the location in Germany where it was first uncovered. Neanderthals are classified either as a subspecies of Homo sapiens or as a distinct species of the...

Homo sapiens idaltu
2013-09-24 12:20:45

Homo sapiens idaltu is an extinct subspecies of Homo sapiens that lived nearly 160,000 years ago during the Pleistocene in Africa. “Idaltu” comes from the Saho-Afar word meaning “elder” or “first born”. The fossilized remains of H. s. idaltu were uncovered at Herto Bouri near the Middle Awash site of Ethiopia’s Afar Triangle in the year 1997 by Tim White, but were first revealed in 2003. Herto Bouri is a portion of Ethiopia under volcanic layers. By using radioisotope dating,...

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