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Latest Andean civilizations Stories

Nazca Lines in the Peruvian Desert
2014-05-06 09:22:42

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study indicates that in ancient Peru residents formed lines of rock which may have directed people to fairs and trade sites around 300 B.C., reports Dan Vergano of National Geographic News. The Paracas people placed these piles of rock, with some stretching more than 1.9 miles, in the highlands and built ceremonial mounds near their homes along the Andean coast. This predates the famous Nazca lines by centuries. The Paracas...

2013-12-23 23:04:29

Aerial Digital Archeology & Preservation (A.D.A.P), a non-invasive technology research group, has been exploring a mysterious rock structure discovered in the remote area of the Llanganates, a region famous for its connections with Inca legends. The site could belong to an ancient culture, be the emerged part of a buried pyramid, the lost tomb of the most famous Inca ruler or a unique natural formation. Miami, FL (PRWEB) December 23, 2013 Bruce Fenton, a British author, published a...

Three New Lizards From The Andes Of Peru Discovered
2013-12-18 10:05:16

Pensoft Publishers Three beautiful new lizards from the Andes of Peru have been delimited and discovered using different lines of evidences by Peruvian and American biologists from San Marcos and Brigham Young universities respectively. The study was published in the open access journal Zookeys. These lizards have been "hidden" and confused with other lizards of the same group because of their overall similar appearance. However this study, which includes molecular, ecological and more...

Pre-Incan Wari People Exercised Restraint In Establishing Its Culture
2013-10-17 06:42:56

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A complex pre-Columbian America civilization that preceded the Inca Empire, the Wari didn't rule by pillage, plunder and iron-fisted bureaucracy alone. A new study from Dartmouth College shows that the Wari people initially created loosely administered colonies to expand trade, provide land for settlers and tap natural resources across much of the central Andes. The findings, published in the Journal of Anthropological...

2013-09-29 23:04:37

Tour Focuses on How Disasters and Climate Change Affected Ancient People Cortez, CO (PRWEB) September 29, 2013 With drought, floods, and earthquakes frequently making the evening news, scientists are investigating how ancient civilizations responded to catastrophes as a way to learn about how disasters and climate change may affect our world. Next year, travelers can join two scholars in this field on Crow Canyon’s Pre-Inca Cultures of Peru: Ancient Cultures and Catastrophes in the...

Evidence Suggests Incas Drugged Child Sacrifices
2013-08-06 18:32:21

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Incas were known for a ritual sacrifice called 'capacocha' and a new analysis in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals that the young children who gave their lives in this ritual were most likely drugged and drunk around the time of their death. In the study, an international archeology team analyzed the 500-year-old remains of three children who were naturally mummified atop the 20,000-foot-high...

Ancient Unlooted Royal Wari Tomb Discovered In Peru
2013-06-27 11:55:20

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A team of Polish and Peruvian researchers has discovered one of the most remarkable tombs in South America, and despite much excitement, the excavators knew they had to keep it a secret from the public, according to a National Geographic report. The stunning find, an ancient imperial tomb of the Wari, had only first come to light in January 2010 while Milosz Giersz, an archaeologist at the University of Warsaw in Poland, and...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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