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Latest Andrew Heymsfield Stories

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2011-07-01 05:30:00

Researchers say that aircraft can lead to increased snowfall around the world's major airports. New research shows that numerous private and commercial flights have been drilling holes and canals though clouds, influencing the snow and rainfall below them. The inadvertent cloud-seeding effects are facilitated by the expansion and cooling of air behind a propeller aircraft's engine blades and over aircraft wings when supercooled cloud temperatures are about 14 degrees Fahrenheit and...

2011-06-30 19:26:51

Researchers have found that areas near commercial airports sometimes experience a small but measurable increase in rain and snow when aircraft take off and land under certain atmospheric conditions. The new study led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), is part of ongoing research that focuses on so-called hole punch and canal clouds that form when planes fly through certain mid-level clouds, forcing nearby air to rapidly expand and cool. This causes water droplets to...

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2010-06-14 14:20:00

As turboprop and jet aircraft climb or descend under certain atmospheric conditions, they can inadvertently seed mid-level clouds and cause narrow bands of snow or rain to develop and fall to the ground, new research finds. Through this seeding process, they leave behind odd-shaped holes or channels in the clouds, which have long fascinated the public. The key ingredient for developing these holes in the clouds: water droplets at subfreezing temperatures, below about 5 degrees Fahrenheit (-15...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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