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Latest Andrew Leier Stories

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2011-03-29 06:19:08

Sedimentary differences on either side of border date back 120 million years Canadians have always seen themselves as separate and distinct from their American neighbors to the south, and now they have geological proof. New research published in April's edition of Geology shows that rock formations roughly along the same political boundary as the two North American countries formed as early as 120 million years ago. Dr. Andrew Leier, of the Department of Geoscience at the University of...

2009-01-08 17:29:17

Pebbles that become part of clastic rocks in places like Arizona's Lower Antelope Canyon don't move with the wind but against it, a geosciences professor said. Rather than being pushed into formations, the pebbles, or clasts, have the loose sand around them removed by the wind, Andrew Leier of the University of Calgary said in the journal Geology. The sand removal causes scour-pits to form on the wind side of larger clasts, and the pebbles eventually fall toward the wind into the scours, he...

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2009-01-07 11:25:00

At first, figuring out how pebble-sized rocks organize themselves in evenly-spaced patterns in sand seemed simple and even intuitive. But once Andrew Leier, an assistant geoscience professor at the U of C, started observing, he discovered that the most commonly held notions did not apply. And even more surprising, was that his findings revealed answers to NASA's questions about sediment transport and surface processes on Mars. Those results are published in this month's edition of Geology....


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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