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Latest Androgen Stories

2010-07-21 14:36:45

Prostate cancer advances when tumors become resistant to hormone therapy, which is the standard treatment for patients, and begin producing their own androgens. Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found that blocking one of the enzymatic steps that allow the tumor to produce androgens could be the key in halting a tumor's growth. The findings, appearing online and in the August issue of Endocrinology, suggest that this step might one day provide a new avenue of therapy for...

2010-07-07 13:31:11

In its early stages, prostate cancer requires androgens (hormones that promote the development and maintenance of male sex characteristics) for growth, and current first-line therapies target the receptor for these hormones to slow cancer's development and spread. However, advanced prostate cancers are often androgen-independent, meaning that androgen-blocking therapies are ineffective. Scientists aren't sure how this shift occurs as prostate cancer advances. One idea is that prostate cancer...

2010-05-27 09:59:13

Implications for treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome, No. 1 cause of female infertility Male sex hormones, such as testosterone, have well defined roles in male reproduction and prostate cancer. What may surprise many is that they also play an important role in female fertility. A new study finds that the presence and activity of male sex hormones in the ovaries helps regulate female fertility, likely by controlling follicle growth and development and preventing deterioration of...

2010-05-19 09:45:00

Drugs should be developed to target gene fusions in prostate cancer, research shows Prostate cancer treatments that target the hormone androgen and its receptor may be going after the wrong source, according to a new study. Researchers have found that when two genes fuse together to cause prostate cancer, it blocks the receptor for the hormone androgen, preventing prostate cells from developing normally. The study, from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, suggests...

2010-04-01 10:00:18

Study detailing molecular interactions highlighted as "paper of the week" in scientific journal Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) scientists have determined how two proteins required for the initiation and development of prostate cancer interact at the molecular level, which could lead to improved treatments for the disease. One of the proteins, androgen receptor, is already an important drug target for prostate cancer.  The other, steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC3), was originally...

2010-01-05 15:50:48

IAD shows tolerability and quality of life advantages 'Potential Benefits of Intermittent Androgen Suppression Therapy in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review of the Literature' is the title of an article by P-A. Abrahamsson in the January issue of European Urology, the official journal of the European Association of Urology. The author evaluates available evidence regarding the efficacy and tolerability of intermittent androgen deprivation (IAD) and assess its value in the...

2009-12-09 18:00:06

On rare occasions, an infant is born with outward appearance of a female but the XY chromosomes of a male. If the child has a normal Y chromosome -- the chromosome responsible for testicular development -- the condition is known as androgen insensitivity syndrome. Experts estimate such births occur in about one in 20,000 infants. Other children are born with a partial form of the condition that can affect their genitalia and/or fertility, but how many is not known. The cause is a wide range...

2009-11-30 15:43:02

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that manipulating testicular hormone levels can turn male fertility on and off, representing new strategy for developing 'the pill' for men and for treating male infertility A new research report published in the December 2009 print issue of The FASEB Journal could one day give men similar type of control over their fertility that women have had since the 1960s. That's because scientists have found how and where androgenic hormones work in the testis...

2009-09-26 10:24:01

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) in collaboration with researchers from Lahey Clinic Northshore, Peabody, Mass., believe that androgen deficiency might be the underlying cause for a variety of common clinical conditions, including diabetes, erectile dysfunction, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease (CVD). These findings appear in the September/October issue of the Journal of Andrology. Androgens are a steroid hormone, such as testosterone, that controls...

2009-07-23 11:50:19

A study led by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute reveals how late-stage, hormone-independent prostate tumors gain the ability to grow without need of hormones.The onset of hormone-independent growth marks an advanced and currently incurable stage of prostate cancer.The study, published in the July 24, 2009, issue of the journal Cell, focuses on androgen receptors, molecules located in the nucleus of cells of the prostate...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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