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Latest Angel Raich Stories

2004-12-01 03:00:13

Traditional drugs have done little to help 39-year-old Angel Raich. Beset by ailments that include tumors in her brain, seizures, spasms and nausea, she has been able to find comfort only in the marijuana that is recommended by her doctor. On Monday, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case that will determine whether Ms. Raich and similar patients in California and 10 other states can continue to use marijuana for medical purposes. At issue is whether states have the right to...

2004-12-01 00:00:07

The Associated Press WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court questioned whether state medical marijuana laws might be abused by people who aren't really sick as it debated on Monday whether the federal government can prosecute patients who smoke pot on doctors' orders. The stakes are high on both the government level - 11 states have passed medical marijuana laws since 1996 - and the personal. In the courtroom watching the argument was Angel Raich, an Oakland, Calif., mother of two who said she...

2004-11-30 18:00:12

Some patients say the outcome of the case Monday is essentially a matter of life or death. * * * OAKLAND, Calif. - Traditional drugs have done little to help 39-year-old Angel Raich. Beset by a nightmarish list of ailments that includes tumors in her brain and uterus, seizures, spasms and nausea, she has been able to find comfort only in the marijuana that is recommended by her doctor. It eases her pain, allows her to rise out of a wheelchair and promotes an appetite that...

2004-11-30 15:00:10

WASHINGTON -- A lawyer for chronic-pain sufferers argued before the Supreme Court on Monday that these people, upon a doctor's recommendation, should be allowed to smoke marijuana to relieve their suffering. The justices treated the argument skeptically, appearing more receptive to a federal attorney who said that permitting an unapproved, medicinal use for marijuana would defeat Congress' goal of stifling the illegal drug trade. It is "a bit optimistic" to believe that marijuana can be...

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2004-11-30 00:00:33

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court questioned whether state medical marijuana laws might be abused by people who aren't really sick as it debated Monday whether the federal government can prosecute patients who smoke pot on doctors' orders. The stakes are high on both the government level - 11 states have passed medical marijuana laws since 1996 - and the personal. In the courtroom watching the argument were Angel Raich, an Oakland, Calif., mother of two who said she tried dozens of...

2004-11-30 00:00:31

Nov. 30--WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court Monday jumped into the fight over the use of illegal drugs for health purposes, as the justices debated whether allowing medical marijuana use is a necessary kindness in a compassionate society or a dangerous move that could undermine the fight against narcotics. The immediate subject was whether the federal government's strict anti-drug laws should override a California statute that allows those suffering from chronic pain or other symptoms...

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2004-11-29 15:00:12

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court appeared hesitant Monday to endorse medical marijuana for patients who have a doctor's recommendation. Justices are considering whether sick people in 11 states with medical marijuana laws can get around a federal ban on pot. Paul Clement, the Bush administration's top court lawyer, noted that California allows people with chronic physical and mental health problems to smoke pot and said that potentially many people are subjecting themselves to health...

2004-11-29 12:00:20

Correction In this story about a medical marijuana hearing coming before the Supreme Court, The Associated Press reported erroneously that part of the question before justices involved whether states could adopt such laws. That specific issue is not part of the case before the court. Rather, the justices will decide whether federal agents have the authority to prosecute individuals who are abiding by their state's medical marijuana law. OAKLAND, Calif. -- Traditional drugs have done...

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2004-11-29 09:00:18

WASHINGTON - Angel Raich tried dozens of prescription medicines to ease the pain of a brain tumor and other illnesses before she took up another drug: pot. The 39-year-old mother of two has the support of her doctor and a California medical marijuana law when she uses a blend of a marijuana variety known as "Haze X" every few hours. Dozens of people camped out outside the Supreme Court, some with blankets, to hear justices debate Monday whether that's enough to protect Raich from the...

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2004-11-29 03:00:00

WASHINGTON - Angel Raich tried dozens of prescription medicines to ease the pain of a brain tumor and other illnesses before she took up another drug: pot. The mother of two has the support of her doctor and a California medical marijuana law when she lights her pot pipe every few hours. The Supreme Court hears arguments Monday whether that's enough to protect Raich from the federal government, which makes no exceptions for the seriously ill in its war on drugs. Groups such as the Drug...


Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.