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Latest Angina pectoris Stories

2008-06-24 02:29:21

By Ask Dr. Ramo BARRY RAMO For the Journal Three weeks ago, I got a call from the wife of one of my longtime patients telling me that her 60-year-old husband had died suddenly at home while reading the newspaper. After Tim Russert died suddenly under similar circumstances, every patient in my cardiology practice asks "how could that happen" and "how can I keep it from happening to me?" Russert passed a stress test two months ago. He was taking blood pressure medication and a...

2008-06-24 02:29:21

PALO ALTO, Calif., June 23 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- CV Therapeutics, Inc. today announced that the Archives of Internal Medicine published results of a major study demonstrating that one in five patients studied experienced chest pain one year after a myocardial infarction (MI), or heart attack, and that this angina was associated with significantly elevated rates of depression among cardiac patients in the registry. PREMIER (Prospective Registry Evaluating Myocardial Infarction: Events...

2007-02-28 12:01:36

St. Jude Medical, Inc. (NYSE:STJ) today announced the first patient implant in a pilot study that will preliminarily evaluate if stimulating nerves near the spinal cord will control chronic chest pain caused by angina. A 53-year-old Massachusetts woman is the first person to receive this investigational device, called the Genesis® Neurostimulation System. She is one of approximately 1.3 million Americans who suffer from chronic angina, according to the American...

2006-12-24 03:00:08

By Nasir, Javed M; Durning, Steven J; Sweet, Jon M; Cation, Lannie J Chest pain with electrocardiographic changes is usually a life- threatening presentation of cardiac ischemia. There are, however, a variety of noncardiac conditions that have been reported to mimic these clinical and electrocardiographic changes. An Asian woman presented with chest pain and ST segment elevations in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery. She had persisting chest pain and ST segment...

2006-08-02 10:30:00

By Megan Rauscher NEW YORK -- A large number of adults with both high blood pressure and high cholesterol are not receiving treatment, a study shows. High blood pressure, or hypertension, and high cholesterol (a.k.a., hypercholesterolemia), are two important modifiable risk factors for heart and circulatory disease. "We were surprised that, despite well-publicized guidelines and treatments available for hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, less than a third are being treated for both...

2006-05-04 11:40:00

NEW YORK -- Some heart attack survivors may be able to go back to work much sooner than is typically recommended, a preliminary study suggests. Australian researchers found that certain heart attack patients were able to return to work just two weeks after suffering the attack, without raising their risk of a repeat attack or other complications. The study included only those patients deemed to be at low risk of a second heart attack, based on tests conducted during their hospital stay. The...

2006-03-21 11:30:00

NEW YORK -- Women have a similarly high incidence of stable angina -- chest pain due to inadequate blood flow to the heart -- as men, the results of a study released today indicate. Moreover, "angina in women appears to be more serious than many doctors, or indeed the general public, realize," study chief Dr. Harry Hemingway from University College London Medical School told Reuters Health. "Angina in women is associated with an increased risk of dying from heart disease." Yet despite this,...

2006-03-14 12:50:00

By Deena Beasley ATLANTA -- Injecting bone marrow cells into heart muscle has for the first time been shown to increase the ability of patients with severe heart disease to exercise and more effectively pump blood, researchers said on Tuesday. A patient's bone marrow contains adult stem cells that are believed to contribute to the regeneration of cardiac tissue and the development of new blood vessels. Results from a trial of the treatment in 28 patients were presented at a meeting of the...

2006-02-20 17:15:00

By Lisa Richwine WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Taking prescription beta blocker or statin drugs may boost the chances of having only mild chest pain instead of a heart attack as the first symptom of heart disease, U.S. researchers reported on Monday. The scientists studied 1,400 patients newly diagnosed with heart disease to try to pinpoint why some had a heart attack while others experienced chest pain known as exercise-induced angina, which is far less dangerous. Twice as many of the chest pain...

2006-01-26 17:45:58

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - New research indicates that up to 50 percent of Asians carry a genetic variant or "polymorphism" that makes nitroglycerin less effective, or even ineffective, for the treatment of angina. Angina is a pain in the chest that occurs when blood flow, and thus oxygen flow, to the heart is insufficient. It is the top symptom of coronary artery disease. Stable angina occurs during exertion and can usually be treated with rest and nitroglycerin, which is placed...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.