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Latest Angina pectoris Stories

2006-01-26 17:45:58

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - New research indicates that up to 50 percent of Asians carry a genetic variant or "polymorphism" that makes nitroglycerin less effective, or even ineffective, for the treatment of angina. Angina is a pain in the chest that occurs when blood flow, and thus oxygen flow, to the heart is insufficient. It is the top symptom of coronary artery disease. Stable angina occurs during exertion and can usually be treated with rest and nitroglycerin, which is placed...

2005-12-19 13:55:20

By Anne Harding NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - California researchers have found no link between cocaine use and hardening of the arteries in a study of more than 3,000 adults. The findings suggest that the drug's heart-damaging effects likely occur immediately after use, and do not result from any long-term effects, Dr. Mark Pletcher of the University of California at San Francisco, the study's lead author, told Reuters Health. Cocaine use is known to boost heart rate and blood...

2005-11-22 16:13:06

CHICAGO (Reuters) - The blood-thinning drug Lovenox works as well as a standard artery-clearing drug in patients with severe heart-related chest pain, but neither reduced the risk of death after a year of treatment, a study said on Tuesday. The research, paid for by Aventis Pharmaceuticals, a member of the Sanofi-Aventis Group which makes Lovenox, involved nearly 10,000 patients at 487 hospitals in 12 countries who suffered from acute coronary syndromes -- severe angina that cannot...

2005-09-01 18:06:25

LONDON (Reuters) - Cardiovascular disease in women is under-diagnosed and under-treated compared to cases in men, an expert said on Friday. "Many women are unaware that coronary heart disease is their main killer; their biggest fear is breast cancer," Ghada Mikhail, of North West London Hospitals and St Mary's Hospital Trust in London, wrote in an editorial in the British Medical Journal. Although the disease kills more women in Europe than men and is a leading cause of death in...

2005-08-01 12:12:48

By David Douglas NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Elderly diabetic patients with chronic heart-related chest pain -- angina -- benefit from surgery to open blocked coronary arteries to the same degree as similar heart patients without diabetes, according to Swiss researchers. As senior investigator Dr. Mathias E. Pfisterer told Reuters Health, "elderly patients and their physicians may choose either an invasive strategy ... or a medical strategy with a similar long-term outcome." Each choice...

2005-06-27 14:36:48

June 21, 2005 "“ A preeminent cardiologist reports, for the first time in a large prospective study, that certain of his patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) and heart problems can now safely use erection drugs that help up to 80% of men restore function and quality of life. Dr. Graham Jackson, who established a unique clinic inEngland dedicated to providing sexual advice to men with cardiac disease and ED, conducted the largest scientific study of its kind, on 425 men with ED and...

2004-11-28 03:00:16

Background: C-reactive protein (CRP), which has been suggested to directly enhance inflammation in plaques, is rapidly synthesized and secreted in the liver 6 h after an acute inflammatory stimulus. Therefore, serum levels of CRP within 6 h after the onset of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) merely reflect a chronic and persistent inflammatory process and are not due to acute myocardial damage. We hypothesized that the serum CRP level, which would abnormally elevate thereafter, is followed...

2004-11-28 03:00:13

Does It Masquerade as "Idiopathic Pericarditis" Following Silent Infarcts? In this issue of CHEST (see page 1680), Bendjelid and Pugin have called attention to the current scarcity of Dressler syndrome. The post-myocardial infarction syndrome (PMIS) [Dressler syndrome] indeed appears to be disappearing in the last quaarter century.1 Although there is some dissent,2 investigators who see large numbers of patients with myocardial infarction (MI), including infarction pericarditis...

2004-11-28 03:00:13

Post-acute myocardial infarction (AMI) syndrome was first described by Dressler in 1956. Its incidence has decreased in the reperfusion era, most likely because of the extensive use of thrombolysis and coronary balloon angioplasty, therapies that dramatically decreased the size of myocardial necrosis. The authors suggest that drugs that have been prescribed in previous decades as the post-AMI "standard-of-care," such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, and statins,...

2004-11-28 03:00:13

More women than men die of heart disease, yet a woman's heart disease symptoms are more likely to be overlooked. Learn how to recognize heart disease in women and help them get the treatment they need. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in both women and men in the United States. Although many women believe that they're more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, their risk of CVD is actually significantly greater. In fact, heart- disease-related deaths outnumber...


Word of the Day
ambsace
  • Bad luck; misfortune.
  • The smallest amount possible or the most worthless thing.
The word 'ambsace' comes from a Latin word meaning 'both'.