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Latest Angina pectoris Stories

2012-04-25 09:35:20

Findings could help explain why women are more likely than men to have coronary symptoms after emotional upsets Coronary artery disease continues to be a major cause of death in the U.S., killing hundreds of thousands of people per year. However, this disease burden isn't evenly divided between the sexes; significantly more men than women are diagnosed with coronary artery disease each year. The reasons behind this difference aren't well defined. Though some studies have shown that men's...

2012-03-27 00:41:32

Rhode Island Hospital study shows safe and effective protocol for chest pain patients Rhode Island Hospital (www.rhodeislandhospital.org) physicians report that managing chest pain patients within an emergency department chest pain unit by both emergency medicine staff and cardiologists is safe and effective and may lower the use of stress testing. A new study indicates that when patients were jointly managed and when stress testing was largely at the discretion of a cardiologist, stress...

Women’s Heart Attack Symptoms Result In Treatment Delays, Higher Risk Of Death
2012-02-22 06:04:10

Women are less likely than men to seek medical help when having a heart attack, and are more likely to die in the hospital, according to a new study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study, which tracked more than 1.1 million patients, found that women — particularly younger women — were less likely to arrive at the hospital with chest pain or discomfort following a heart attack. Those symptoms, or lack of symptoms, can result in...

2012-02-07 12:22:48

In the UK, the exercise electrocardiogram (ECG) is the most common initial test for the evaluation of stable chest pain and has been used widely for almost half a century. However, recent NICE guidelines recommend that it should not be used to diagnose or exclude stable angina in patient assessments. New research published in the BMJ Open finds that the test has other uses that transcend its technical contribution to diagnosis. The study, led by Professor Gene Feder from the University of...

2011-11-16 09:35:43

In a contemporary cohort of acute heart attack patients, 70 percent of the patients were unaware they had coronary heart disease (CHD) prior to the event and 60 percent of those patients were women or young men. However, these two subgroups are less likely to qualify for aggressive preventive therapy and, therefore, do not receive preventive medications that could reduce the heart attack risk, according to a study being presented at the American Heart Association (AHA) scientific sessions in...

2011-11-02 21:50:08

When given for hours as a continuous dose, the heart medication nitroglycerin backfires -- increasing the severity of subsequent heart attacks, according to a study of the compound in rats by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. "Basically it's a cautionary tale," said professor of chemical and systems biology Daria Mochly-Rosen, PhD, senior author of the study that will be published Nov. 2 in Science Translational Medicine. "Here is a practice in medicine used for...

2011-10-25 11:34:10

A Heart and Stroke Foundation study has found that women under age 55 fare worse than their male counterparts following a heart attack — and their health status declines more than that of their male counterparts after one month. The AMI55 study found that women between the ages of 20 and 55 had significantly worse physical limitations, more recurrences of chest pain, and worse quality of life than men one month after a heart attack — and, compared to their baseline scores,...

2011-10-11 18:04:16

Fewer deaths and myocardial infarctions in unstable angina pectoris and NSTEMI / AMNOG procedure has passed the first practical test Since the start of 2011, the active ingredient ticagrelor can be prescribed in Germany in addition to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) to avoid blood clots in patients with acute ischaemia of the cardiac muscle. The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) has now examined whether ticagrelor offers advantages to patients with acute...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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