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Latest angina Stories

2013-03-12 23:01:16

Pain reduction effects of ranolazine most pronounced in patients with poor glucose control A commonly used anti-anginal drug reduces chest pain in patients with type 2 diabetes and appears to have a more pronounced effect in those with poorer glucose control, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session. Ranolazine is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of chronic angina, or chest pain, both...

2012-02-28 14:48:00

A meta-analysis of eight previously published clinical trials suggests that initial stent implantation for patients with stable coronary artery disease is not associated with improved outcomes compared with initial medical therapy for prevention of death, nonfatal heart attacks, unplanned revascularization or angina, according to a study published in the Feb. 27 Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. The article is part of the journal's Less is More series. While...

2011-12-21 22:55:11

Scots of Pakistani origin are 50 percent more likely to be admitted to hospital with chest pain and angina than those of Indian ethnicity, a study has found Scots of Pakistani origin are 50 per cent more likely to be admitted to hospital with chest pain and angina than those of Indian ethnicity, a study has found. Scots of Indian and Pakistani origin also have much greater levels of hospital admissions for both conditions than people of white Scottish ethnicity. Those of Pakistani...

2011-07-08 14:03:57

Study finds improvement in chest pain and exercise tolerance New research published online today in Circulation Research found that injections of adult patients' own CD34+ stem cells reduced reports of angina episodes and improved exercise tolerance time in patients with chronic, severe refractory angina (severe chest discomfort that did not respond to other therapeutic options). The phase II prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted at 26 centers in the...

2011-07-08 13:47:59

An injection of stem cells into the heart could offer hope to many of the 850,000 Americans whose chest pain doesn't subside even with medicine, angioplasty or surgery, according to a study in Circulation Research: Journal of the American Heart Association. Patients who received the new treatment reported half as many chest pain episodes and improved exercise capability compared to those who received a placebo. The study was the first randomized, controlled trial of stem-cell therapy to show...

2011-03-18 00:00:26

Indicated for acute relief of an attack or acute prophylaxis of angina pectoris due to coronary artery disease Cranford, NJ (PRWEB) March 16, 2011 Coronary artery disease (CAD), also known as coronary heart disease, is the most common type of heart disease, currently affecting about 17 million Americans.(1) Most of these people suffer from a common symptom of CAD known as angina pectoris. For over 100 years, physicians have treated acute angina with nitrates, the most common form being...

2011-03-16 02:00:00

CRANFORD, N.J., March 16, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Coronary artery disease (CAD), also known as coronary heart disease, is the most common type of heart disease, currently affecting about 17 million Americans(1). Most of these people suffer from a common symptom of CAD known as angina pectoris. For over 100 years, physicians have treated acute angina with nitrates, the most common form being nitroglycerin(2). Considered the gold standard in treating acute angina, nitroglycerin tablets have...

2010-12-23 17:08:30

Are negative aspects of social relations predictive of angina pectoris? A 6-year follow-up study of middle-aged Danish women and men Shouldering family demands and worries seems to increase the risk of angina, the precursor to coronary artery disease, reveals research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. Previous research has indicated that rewarding personal relationships are a boost for heart health, so the authors wanted to know if the reverse might also be...

2010-10-22 00:00:38

New evidence confirming improved endothelial function in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease, in a randomized, sham-controlled clinical trial Westbury, NY (Vocus) October 21, 2010 Vasomedical, Inc. ("Vasomedical") (OTC: VASO.OB), a world leader in the noninvasive treatment of cardiovascular diseases, today announced the online publication, on October 4, 2010 in the journal Circulation, of new evidence confirming improved endothelial function in patients with symptomatic...

2010-07-08 13:57:42

Women who have the most serious form of angina are three times as likely to develop severe coronary artery disease (CAD) as men with the same condition, according to the July issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine. Canadian researchers looked at the records of 23,771 patients referred for first diagnostic angiography over a six-year period. They found that women over the age of 60 with CCS Class IV angina (as defined by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society) faced a 21% higher absolute risk...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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