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Image 1 - Dramatic Diversity Of Columbine Flowers Explained By Simple Change In Cell Shape
2011-11-16 10:00:49

[ Watch the Video ] To match pollinators' probing tongues, cells in floral spurs elongate, driving rapid speciation Columbine flowers are recognizable by the long, trailing nectar spurs that extend from the bases of their petals, tempting the taste buds of their insect pollinators. New research at Harvard and the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) helps to explain how columbines have achieved a rapid radiation of approximately 70 species, with flowers apparently tailored...

2011-10-26 13:07:32

Phylogeny constrains floral scent rewards in a specialized bee-pollinated group of oil-secreting orchids Bees, bats, and moths all follow their noses in search of food from flowers. Plants that rely on such animals for pollination often produce particular chemical scents that attract specific pollinators. However, the ability to produce certain chemicals is also determined by a plant's genetics, or phylogenetic history, which can potentially limit its ability to respond to pollinator...

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2010-01-12 08:45:00

The 'raspy' cricket is also entirely new to science An orchid researcher based on the island of Reunion in the Indian Ocean and collaborating with researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (RBG Kew) has used motion sensitive night cameras to capture the first known occurrence of a cricket functioning as a pollinator of flowering plants. Not only is this the first time this behavior has been documented in a member of the Orthoptera order of insects "“ who are better known for eating...


Latest Angraecum Reference Libraries

37_a7f656e6148b38873cb2993077a90b12
2005-07-14 00:56:38

Hawk moths (or Sphinx moths) are moths in the family Sphingidae. They are some of the fastest flying insects, capable of flying at over 30 miles per hour (50 km/h). They have a wingspan of 35-150 millimeters. Some hawk moths, like the hummingbird hawk moth, hover in midair while they feed on nectar from flowers and are sometimes mistaken for hummingbirds, even in continents where hummingbirds are not found. The larvae of most species of hawk moth have a "horn" at the posterior end. Because...

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.