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Latest Animal anatomy Stories

2008-07-14 21:00:11

By Leanne Kleinmann Like lots of other 8-year-old boys this summer, my son is all about sports. Soccer, tennis, basketball, swimming. But the highlight of the summer was his baseball team. This year they've graduated to kid-pitch, far beyond T-ball or even the gentle pitches of the coaches/ parents last year. Little did I know that the first year of kid-pitch baseball would be so treacherous. At this age, they (sort of) know how to pitch, catch and bat, but their gangly legs and arms...

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2008-04-30 11:00:00

Human ancestor's teeth yields new cluesTiny marks on the teeth of an ancient human ancestor known as the "Nutcracker Man" may upset current evolutionary understanding of early hominid diet.Using high-powered microscopes, researchers looked at rough geometric shapes on the teeth of several Nutcracker Man specimens and determined that their structure alone was not enough to predict diet.Peter Ungar, professor of anthropology at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, contends the finding...

2008-02-21 13:41:25

Circular markings on creatures such as butterflies are effective against predators because they are conspicuous features, not because they mimic the eyes of the predators' own enemies, according to research published today in the journal, Behavioral Ecology[1]. Zoologists based at the University of Cambridge challenge the 150-year-old theory about why these markings are effective against predators. Many animals possess protective markings to avoid predation, including patterns to reduce the...

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2007-12-14 18:50:00

ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- In what some scientists see as another alarming consequence of global warming, thousands of Pacific walruses above the Arctic Circle were killed in stampedes earlier this year after the disappearance of sea ice caused them to crowd onto the shoreline in extraordinary numbers. The deaths took place during the late summer and fall on the Russian side of the Bering Strait, which separates Alaska from Russia. "It was a pretty sobering year - tough on walruses," said Joel...

2006-04-05 12:25:00

LONDON -- Long before the invention of electric drills and anaesthesia early humans drilled teeth to treat decay, according to research published on Wednesday. But in the absence of modern metal tools the Neolithic drill of choice 9,000 years ago was a flint head, according to Roberto Macchiarelli, of the University of Poitiers in France. While excavating in Pakistan, Macchiarelli and a team of international scientists found drilled molars from nine adults discovered in a grave that date from...

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2005-12-22 22:10:00

Once the subject of mythical accounts of magical power, the helix-shaped tusk of the narwhal, or "unicorn" whale has proved to be an extraordinary sensory organ, according to a team of researchers from Harvard University, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Paffenbarger Research Center of the American Dental Association Foundation (ADAF) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The team's results were presented Dec. 13 at a technical conference in San Diego. Measuring up...

2005-12-13 16:32:00

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The narwhal's mysterious spiral tusk works as a giant sensor to help it test water qualities and to smooch other narwhals, a U.S. researcher said on Tuesday. The whale's eight-foot (2.4-meter) long tusk has long mystified naturalists and hunters, and the explanation may be equally intriguing, Harvard School of Dental Medicine researcher Dr. Martin Nweeia said. The tusk, it seems, has hydrodynamic-sensing capabilities, Nweeia said in a statement released ahead...

2005-09-14 14:30:00

LONDON -- Tests of nuclear bombs conducted in the 1950s have had an unexpected benefit for forensic scientists. A permanent record of the fallout from above-ground tests is embedded in tooth enamel and allows scientists to estimate the age of a person at the time of death more precisely. Jonas Frisen, of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, who developed the method, said it has already been used to help identify people who died in the Indian Ocean tsunami last year. American researchers are...

2005-08-29 15:37:12

Research published by the University of Helsinki, Finland, indicates that cytostatic and radiation therapies administered before stem cell transplantation often damage children's permanent teeth. Detrimental effects of cytostatic and radiation therapies on dental development have been known for a long time, but knowledge about the dental consequences of high-dose anticancer therapy preceding stem cell transplantation has so far been scarce. Päivi Hölttä, Licentiate in...

2005-08-04 17:37:01

A Penn State researcher is part of the team that developed techniques that have generated insights into dietary divergences between some of our human ancestors, allowing scientists to better understand the evolutionary path that led to the modern-day diets that humans consume. "Our new techniques are allowing us to get beyond simple dichotomies and helping us understand the processes by which dietary evolution is working," said Peter Ungar, professor of anthropology at the University of...


Latest Animal anatomy Reference Libraries

Atlantic Fire Ascidian, Pyrosoma atlanticum
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Pyrosoma atlanticum is a species of colonial tunicate found in temperate waters worldwide, usually between 50°N and 50°S. It is most plentiful at depths below 800 feet. It is found in colonies that are pelagic and move throughout the water column. In the evening the colony will move closer to the surface and descend back by dawn. Large colonies can rise and descend more than 2,500 feet in a single day. A colony of this species is cylindrical and can grow up to 2 feet long and 2.5 inches...

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2009-10-16 17:56:55

Heterodontosaurus, meaning "different toothed lizard", is a genus of dinosaur from the Early Jurassic Period of what is now South Africa. The type species, H. tucki, was found in the Upper Elliot Formation of the Hettangian age (199 to 196 million years ago). Two species are known. This herbivorous dinosaur ate mostly plants despite having canines. It was a small ornithischian reaching a total length of 3 feet. It had a long, narrow pelvic bone which was like more advanced ornithischians....

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2007-10-24 12:34:20

The Giant Pangolin (Manis gigantea), is a species of pangolin. The Giant Pangolin inhabits Africa with a range stretching along the Equator from West Africa to Uganda. It is found mainly in savanna, rainforest, and forest, where there is a large termite population and available water. It does not inhabit high altitude areas. The Giant Pangolin is the largest species of pangolin (scaly anteaters). It belongs to the Manidae family. It was first described by Johann Karl Wilhelm Illiger in 1815....

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2007-03-19 15:27:17

The Southern Alligator Lizard, Elgaria multicarinata, is a lizard native to the Pacific coast of North America. It is common throughout Southern California and can be found in both grasslands and urban areas. Several subspecies can be distinguished, including the San Diego alligator lizard. It has a prehensile tail up to twice the length of its body. Like many lizards, however, it can drop its tail if attacked, possibly giving it a chance to flee; the tail will regenerate, but will never...

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2007-03-19 14:41:22

The Triplewart seadevil, Cryptopsaras couesii, is a seadevil of the family Ceratiidae, found in all oceans, from the surface to 1.24 mi (2,000 m). Its length is approximately 11.81 in (30 cm). The Triplewart seadevil is one of the most abundant of the deepwater anglerfish. These fish have round flabby bodies with a soft fibrous skeleton and a scaleless prickly skin. Like most other deepwater anglerfishes this fish has small eyes, no pelvic fins and is colored black. It has a large...

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Word of the Day
lambent
  • Licking.
  • Hence Running along or over a surface, as if in the act of licking; flowing over or along; lapping or bathing; softly bright; gleaming.
This word comes the Latin 'lambere,' to lick.
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