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Latest Animal cognition Stories

2014-07-10 23:01:38

A chimpanzee’s intelligence is largely determined by its genes, while environmental factors may be less important than scientists previously thought, according to a Georgia State University research study. (PRWEB) July 10, 2014 A chimpanzee’s intelligence is largely determined by its genes, while environmental factors may be less important than scientists previously thought, according to a Georgia State University research study. The study found that some, but not all, cognitive, or...

2014-06-18 11:22:57

Springer Review of mental ability shows fish are on par with most animals Do you still believe that fish are dumb and cannot feel pain? That we do not have to worry much about how they are cared for or caught? Think again, says Culum Brown of Macquarie University in Australia, in a review article in Springer’s journal Animal Cognition. The research notes that fish cognition and their sensory perception are generally on par with that of other animals. Brown therefore argues that more...

2014-06-17 16:23:33

New Journal Article Concludes: "Fish Perception and Cognitive Abilities Often Match or Exceed Other Vertebrates." NEW YORK, June 17, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- According to a paper that will be published in the next issue of the esteemed journal Animal Cognition, "fish perception and cognitive abilities often match or exceed other vertebrates." In fact, "fish have a high degree of behavioural plasticity and compare favourably to humans and other terrestrial vertebrates across a range of...

2014-04-02 12:35:10

Study finds pigeons and other animals can place everyday things in categories like humans Pinecone or pine nut? Friend or foe? Distinguishing between the two requires that we pay special attention to the telltale characteristics of each. And as it turns out, us humans aren't the only ones up to the task. According to researchers at the University of Iowa, pigeons share our ability to place everyday things in categories. And, like people, they can hone in on visual information that is...

2013-06-26 16:57:17

Bullfinches have the brain power to learn to sing human melodies accurately Bullfinches learn from human teachers to sing melodies accurately, according to a new study by the late Nicolai Jürgen and researchers from the University of Kaiserslautern in Germany. Their analysis of human melody singing in bullfinches gives insights into the songbirds' brain processes. The work is published online in Springer's journal Animal Cognition. Music performance is considered to be one of the most...

2012-03-22 22:58:39

Do animals have reflective minds able to self-regulate perception, reasoning, memory? According to one of the leading scholars in the field, there is an emerging consensus among scientists that animals share functional parallels with humans' conscious metacognition -- that is, our ability to reflect on our own mental processes and guide and optimize them. In two new contributions to this influential field of comparative psychology, David Smith, PhD, of the University at Buffalo and his...

Image 1 - Bear Spotted Utilizing A Rock As A Tool
2012-03-07 06:40:40

A British scientist, on vacation recently in Alaska´s Glacier Bay National Park, made a phenomenal discovery. While he was photographing a wild brown bear, the animal picked up a barnacle covered stone and began rubbing it on the side of its face. According to Dr. Volker Deecke, of the University of Cumbria, bears could be more advanced than previously thought. Dr. Deecke speculates that the bear was molting and used the stone to rub off fur, or because it may have had irritated skin....

2011-09-22 07:00:00

Organization Dedicated to Wildlife Conservation, Education and Community Development in Sub-Saharan Africa Funds Researchers to Help Resolve Human/Lion Conflict Aspen, Colorado (PRWEB) September 22, 2011 Eli Weiss, the founder of the Wildize Foundation http://www.wildize.org, is in Botswana, Africa through October 14 to observe the organizationâs Conditioned Taste Aversion (CTA) field studies with captive lions on a private reserve there. Weiss, who arrived in Africa on...

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2011-06-13 06:20:00

The kea, a New Zealand parrot, and the New Caledonian crow are members of the two most intelligent avian families. Researchers from the Department of Cognitive Biology of the University of Vienna investigated their problem solving abilities as well as their innovative capacities. They are publishing two new studies "“ one in cooperation with members of the Behavioral Ecology Research Group in Oxford "“ in the scientific journals PLoS ONE and Biology Letters. Parrots and Corvids...

2011-03-30 00:00:30

Lukas, the World's Smartest Horse (according to the World Records Academy) and Guinness World Record Holder, will participate in an experiment designed to determine his level of self-awareness. Lukas' owner/trainer Karen Murdock was a recent guest on Horse Conscious (http://www.horseconscious.com), and this prompted a lively discussion and her further investigation into animal cognition and perception. For a long time, experts have claimed that humans and animals differ in two primary ways:...


Latest Animal cognition Reference Libraries

Ethology
2013-09-30 13:43:45

Ethology, a sub-topic of zoology, is the study of animal behavior that focuses on behavior in natural settings, as opposed to behaviourism, which focuses on the behavior of animals in laboratory settings. The term “ethology” is based off the Greek word ethos, which means character. It was first made popular in 1902 by William Morton Wheeler, an American myrmecologist, but the term was actually suggested by John Stuart Mill in 1843 for use in associationistic psychology. Ethology can also...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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