Quantcast

Latest Animal diseases Stories

New Public Health Challenge Created By Emerging Vector-Borne Diseases
2012-11-30 16:54:18

National Science Foundation Land-use change, globalization of trade and travel, and social upheaval drive emergence of diseases Human activities are advancing the spread of vector-borne, zoonotic diseases such as West Nile virus, Lyme disease and dengue fever, report scientists publishing a series of papers today in the journal The Lancet. Vector-borne zoonotic diseases result from disease-causing agents or pathogens that naturally infect wildlife, and are transmitted to humans by...

2012-11-13 12:11:56

Findings will help our genetic understanding of dangerous new viruses Scientists studying the genes and proteins of human cells infected with a common cold virus have identified a new gene identification technique that could increase the genetic information we hold on animals by around 70 to 80 per cent. The findings, published in Nature Methods, could revolutionize our understanding of animal genetics and disease, and improve our knowledge of dangerous viruses such as SARS that jump the...

2012-11-13 12:10:08

In 2010, 35 people in Greece died from a West Nile virus (WNV) outbreak, with a further 262 laboratory-confirmed human cases. A new article published in BioMedCentral's open access journal Virology Journal examines whether wild or migratory birds could have been responsible for importing and amplifying the deadly virus. WNV is a flavivirus of major public health concern, spread through the bite of infected mosquitoes. Discovered in Uganda in 1937, it was only sporadically reported up until...

2012-11-08 12:28:38

Researchers find a viral symbiont of a protozoan parasite increases virulence to the human host When humans have parasites, the organisms live in our bodies, co-opt our resources and cause disease. However, it turns out that parasites themselves can have their own co-habitants. Researchers from Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital and SUNY Upstate Medical University have found that the pathogenicity of the sexually transmitted protozoan parasite Trichomonas...

Can Dogs Get Flu From You
2012-10-04 09:09:04

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Can your dog get the flu from you? Scientists from Oregon State University (OSU) say the next time you´re sick, you might want to distance yourself from your beloved pets. Their recent research explored the possibility of human-to-pet flu transmissions and found evidence that the infection of pets from humans — especially during the peak of flu season — is a cause for concern. While there´s not much...


Latest Animal diseases Reference Libraries

Eye-worm, Loa loa
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The eye-worm (Loa loa) is a species of roundworm within the Nematoda phylum. It can be found in India and Africa, among other areas. This species causes a disease known as Loa loa filariasis and is one of three species that can cause subcutaneous filariasis in humans. Females are larger than males, reaching an average body length of up to 2.7 inches, with males reaching an average body length of up to 1.3 inches. The first stage of life for the eye-worm begins when an adult worm, which is...

Common Liver Fluke, Fasciola hepatica
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The common liver fluke (Fasciola hepatica), also known as the sheep liver fluke, is a parasitic flatworm in the Trematoda class. This species can infect sheep, cattle, humans, and other animals across the world. This species is one of the largest of its kind, reaching an average body length of 1.1 inches, with a width of up to .5 inches. This species is shaped like a worm and is typically wider at the front end, although some individuals have wider back ends. The front end holds a cone like...

Dog Roundworm, Toxocara canis
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The dog roundworm (Toxocara canis) is a species of parasitic worm that infects canid species. It is yellowish white in color and can reach an average length between 3.5 and 7 inches, with females typically growing large than males. The dog roundworm can be transmitted in four different ways. The most common form of transmission occurs when an egg containing second stage larvae is released onto the ground in feces. Once the egg has been ingested, it will move through the small intestines...

Feline Roundworm, Toxocara cati
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Feline Roundworm (Toxocara cati) is a species of parasitic nematode widely distributed through cats and other felids. It is one of the most common nematode of cats. The adult worm is localized in the gut of the host. In adult cats, infection is typically asymptomatic, meaning there are no symptoms. However, massive infection in juvenile cats can be fatal. The adult feline roundworm may be brownish-yellow to cream colored to pink and may be up to 4 inches in length. It has a short, wide...

45_3aacb4464d2f2975115bbb719c93a502
2011-02-23 17:16:23

Phocine distemper virus (PDV) is a pathogenic for pinniped species such as seals. Signs include labored breathing, fever, and nervous symptoms. It was first identified in 1988 as the cause of death of 18,000 harbour seals along the northern European coast. A PDV epidemic occurred again in 2002 along the North Sea coast resulted in the deaths of 21,700 seals. Numerous carnivorous mammal species in Canada have been found to have antibodies to PDV and CDV which shows that the virus spreads to...

More Articles (8 articles) »
Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
Related