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Latest Animal echolocation Stories

Bats Change Their Strategy When Food Is In Short Supply
2014-09-05 03:10:26

University of Bristol Bats could be more flexible in their echolocation behavior than previously thought, according to a new study into the foraging techniques of the desert long-eared bat by researchers at the University of Bristol. Echolocating bats have historically been classified into two groups: 'loud' aerial hawkers who catch flying insects on the wing and 'whispering' gleaners that pick up prey from the ground. While some bat species can forage in multiple ways, others have...

bats thinkstock 178801959
2014-08-18 03:30:06

Brown University Decades of research on how bats use echolocation to keep a focus on their targets not only lends support to a long debated neuroscience hypothesis about vision but also could lead to smarter sonar and radar technologies. Amid a neuroscience debate about how people and animals focus on distinct objects within cluttered scenes, some of the newest and best evidence comes from the way bats “see” with their ears, according to a new paper in the Journal of Experimental...

Greater mouse-eared bat
2014-07-24 05:09:35

Rayshell Clapper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The manner in which bats use echolocation has long been of interest to scientists, but new research shows that bats use more than echolocation to get around. In fact, the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) recently announced a new discovery about the greater mouse-eared bat and how it navigates. The greater mouse-eared bat uses “polarization patterns in the sky to navigate…The bats use the way the Sun's light is...

2014-04-17 08:20:31

U-Haul SuperGraphics Wants You to Learn The Truth About Bats PHOENIX, April 17, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Celebrate BATS and learn the facts! U-Haul SuperGraphics is recognizing the true role of bats in our environment. What's Fact? What's Myth? What do bats really do and why are they worth protecting? http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20140417/75924 "Often overlooked, or even feared, bats are some of the most diverse, ecologically important and unique mammals on Earth," stated Rob Mies,...

big brown bat in flight
2014-03-29 05:33:03

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While experts have long known that bats use ultrasonic calls to locate insect prey, research published earlier this week reveals that males have a second distinctive set that essentially allows them to call dibs on a potential meal. The new study, which appears in Thursday’s edition of the journal Current Biology, explained that there is a correlation between these special sounds and changes in the flight behavior of other bats....

2014-03-27 23:04:03

University of Maryland scientists discover that male big brown bats emit a special call - different than the ones they use to navigate in flight - that tells their comrades to “back off” from bugs they’ve claimed for themselves. A video animation in .mov format is available on request. College Park, MD (PRWEB) March 27, 2014 Look into the spring sky at dusk and you may see flitting groups of bats, gobbling up insect meals in an intricately choreographed aerial dance. It’s well...

2014-03-27 16:22:01

COLLEGE PARK, Md., March 27, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Look up into the sky at dusk this spring and you're likely to see small groups of bats flitting here and there, gobbling up their insect meals in an intricately choreographed aerial dance. It's well known that echolocation calls keep the bats from hitting trees and each other. But now scientists have learned some bats emit another call: one that tells their comrades to "back off" from bugs they've claimed for themselves....

2014-03-20 08:24:21

Third generation Song Meter SM3 and SM3BAT represent breakthrough in wildlife recording technology MAYNARD, Mass., March 20, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Wildlife Acoustics, the worldwide provider of bioacoustics recording and analytical technology, is shipping its new, 3(rd) generation Song Meter SM3 and SM3BAT bioacoustics recorders. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20140320/NE85896 "Our new Song Meter SM3 and SM3BAT sets a new performance benchmark for bioacoustics recorders", said...

Semirostrum ceruttii
2014-03-14 11:30:12

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers from Yale University have announced the discovery of a new species of ancient porpoise with a massive underbite. According to a report published in the journal Current Biology, the newly discovered cetacean had a jaw that extended nearly 2.8 feet – a unique feature that was probably used to probe to seafloor for something to eat, the study team said. "The extinct porpoise is a bizarre new animal, with the mandible...

New Whale Fossil Species Sheds Light On Evolution Of Echolocation
2014-03-13 09:36:18

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Echolocation is an important tool for several modern species, including bats and some birds. Previous research from New York Institute of Technology’s College of Osteopathic Medicine has found that this powerful navigational tool also existed in a 28-million-year-old relative of modern-day toothed whales, dolphins and porpoises. In new research, published in the journal Nature, Associate Professor Jonathan Geisler, of NYIT, and...


Latest Animal echolocation Reference Libraries

Brandt’s Bat, Myitus brandtii
2013-10-11 08:07:41

The Brandt’s bat has a large population in northwest of England but is endangered in Austria. The Brandt’s Bat has shaggy brown fur with a pale grey belly. This bat is not a large bat and weighs less than half an ounce and measures up to two inches long. Its wingspan is more than triple its body length at 7.5 to 9.5 inches. Brandt’s bat eats only insects (insectivorous) and is not blind. However, echolocation is used for “night-vision,” so that while hunting at night it does...

Common Noctule, Nyctalus noctula
2013-09-17 13:48:36

The common noctule bat is commonly found in Europe, Asia, and North Africa. This bat has a body length of three inches with a wingspan of approximately 14 inches. It is the largest bat found in Europe. It commonly lives in forests but due to human growth there have been populations found in towns dwelling in buildings such as church steeples. The common noctule starts to hunt and fly at dusk which is earlier than other members of the species. These bats fly at speeds up to 31 miles per...

New Zealand lesser short-tailed bat, Mystacina tuberculata
2013-09-17 13:41:27

The lesser short-tailed bat is only found in New Zealand and is the only living species of bat in the Mystacinidae Family. The short-tail is commonly located on the North Island of New Zealand using the forests as its habitat. Roosting is done primarily alone but there have been known colonies of over 100 bats. It prefers to use already hollowed trees or crevices but will chew out a burrow in the wood using its sharp incisor teeth. These roosting locations are only used for a few weeks...

Greater Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum
2012-09-03 06:50:52

The greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) can be found in Japan, Africa, Europe, China, South Asia, Korea, and Australia. It prefers a habitat in warm regions, with open scrub and trees, human settlements, and bodies of water like ponds. It will also inhabit older orchards, glades within woodlands, and permanent pastures, among other areas. Many of its roosts occur in houses in the northern areas of its range and in caves in the southern areas of its range. These bats travel to...

Mehely's Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus mehelyi
2012-08-29 12:52:07

Mehely’s horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus mehelyi) can be found in areas of the Middle East and Eastern Europe, and has a fragmented range. It lives in caves, with a preference for limestone caves with a nearby body of water. It will sometimes roost with other species of horseshoe bats within these caves. It is a medium sized bat, with pale lips and dense fur.  The fur is typically whitish gray in color, with darker fur appearing on the back and lighter fur appearing on the underbelly. As is...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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