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Latest Animal echolocation Stories

2014-03-27 23:04:03

University of Maryland scientists discover that male big brown bats emit a special call - different than the ones they use to navigate in flight - that tells their comrades to “back off” from

2014-03-27 16:22:01

COLLEGE PARK, Md., March 27, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Look up into the sky at dusk this spring and you're likely to see small groups of bats flitting here and there, gobbling up their

2014-03-20 08:24:21

Third generation Song Meter SM3 and SM3BAT represent breakthrough in wildlife recording technology MAYNARD, Mass., March 20, 2014 /PRNewswire/ --

Semirostrum ceruttii
2014-03-14 11:30:12

Researchers from Yale University have announced the discovery of a new species of ancient porpoise with a massive underbite.

New Whale Fossil Species Sheds Light On Evolution Of Echolocation
2014-03-13 09:36:18

Echolocation is an important tool for several modern species, including bats and some birds. Previous research from New York Institute of Technology’s College of Osteopathic Medicine has found that this powerful navigational tool...

2014-02-24 23:04:07

Horne’s Pest Control Company offers tips on dealing with bats as they come back from hibernating all winter. Martinez, GA (PRWEB) February 24, 2014

Ripple Effect Used By Bats When Hunting Frogs During Mating Season
2014-01-24 12:56:12

As male túngara frogs call from their puddles to attract females, they create ripples that spread across the water. According to researchers, these ripples are used by other male frogs to assess their competition – and also by bats looking for their next meal.

New Recording System Reveals Endangered Animals
2014-01-23 13:28:37

Now biologists can get much more accurate information about endangered bats, birds and insects. A new recording system, developed at the University of Southern Denmark, has revealed many previously unknown and highly valuable details about bats.

Bats Rely On Vision To Navigate, Echolocation To Catch Insects: Study
2013-12-13 07:34:50

More than 1,000 species of echolocating bats exist, compared to just 80 species of nocturnal non-echolocating birds. It seems that normal vision works in tandem with echolocation to give bats an evolutionary edge, however, no one knows exactly how.

Nectar Bat Uses Stealthy Moves To Catch Its Evening Dinner
2013-12-12 15:39:25

New research shows the Pallas long-tongued bat is a very stealthy predator when it comes to catching insects. This goes against the earlier belief the bat eats insects when they pass by.


Latest Animal echolocation Reference Libraries

Brandt’s Bat, Myitus brandtii
2013-10-11 08:07:41

The Brandt’s bat has a large population in northwest of England but is endangered in Austria. The Brandt’s Bat has shaggy brown fur with a pale grey belly. This bat is not a large bat and weighs less than half an ounce and measures up to two inches long. Its wingspan is more than triple its body length at 7.5 to 9.5 inches. Brandt’s bat eats only insects (insectivorous) and is not blind. However, echolocation is used for “night-vision,” so that while hunting at night it does...

Common Noctule, Nyctalus noctula
2013-09-17 13:48:36

The common noctule bat is commonly found in Europe, Asia, and North Africa. This bat has a body length of three inches with a wingspan of approximately 14 inches. It is the largest bat found in Europe. It commonly lives in forests but due to human growth there have been populations found in towns dwelling in buildings such as church steeples. The common noctule starts to hunt and fly at dusk which is earlier than other members of the species. These bats fly at speeds up to 31 miles per...

New Zealand lesser short-tailed bat, Mystacina tuberculata
2013-09-17 13:41:27

The lesser short-tailed bat is only found in New Zealand and is the only living species of bat in the Mystacinidae Family. The short-tail is commonly located on the North Island of New Zealand using the forests as its habitat. Roosting is done primarily alone but there have been known colonies of over 100 bats. It prefers to use already hollowed trees or crevices but will chew out a burrow in the wood using its sharp incisor teeth. These roosting locations are only used for a few weeks...

Greater Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum
2012-09-03 06:50:52

The greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) can be found in Japan, Africa, Europe, China, South Asia, Korea, and Australia. It prefers a habitat in warm regions, with open scrub and trees, human settlements, and bodies of water like ponds. It will also inhabit older orchards, glades within woodlands, and permanent pastures, among other areas. Many of its roosts occur in houses in the northern areas of its range and in caves in the southern areas of its range. These bats travel to...

Mehely's Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus mehelyi
2012-08-29 12:52:07

Mehely’s horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus mehelyi) can be found in areas of the Middle East and Eastern Europe, and has a fragmented range. It lives in caves, with a preference for limestone caves with a nearby body of water. It will sometimes roost with other species of horseshoe bats within these caves. It is a medium sized bat, with pale lips and dense fur.  The fur is typically whitish gray in color, with darker fur appearing on the back and lighter fur appearing on the underbelly. As is...

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