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Latest Animal echolocation Stories

Moths Use Hearing Differently When Picking Up Mating Calls
2013-07-08 14:30:46

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A joint team of Japanese and Danish researchers has found various moth species taking Salt-n-Pepa's suggestion to the next level -- talking about sex in a variety of ways. Lepidopterists have thought for years that moths use their sense of hearing to avoid predation from bats. However, the new study, which was published in Scientific Reports, revealed that their tiny ears are also used to detect the mating whispers of other moths....

Moths Jam Bat Echolocation Systems
2013-07-05 09:04:09

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For years, the military has used radio signals to jam an enemy's radar and a new study in the journal Biology Letters suggests hawk moths use the same technique to evade predation by bats. According to the study's authors from the University of Florida, hawk moths emit sonic pulses from their genitals in response to the high-frequency echolocation that bats produce to locate prey. "This is just the first step toward understanding a...

UK Team Uses Echolocation To Produce Highly Detailed Bat Maps
2013-07-03 12:42:13

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Using over 15,000 recordings of echolocation sounds gathered from across the UK countryside, researchers from the University of Leeds have rendered the most detailed, large-scale maps of bat distribution in northern England. According to the researchers, the bat maps are especially significant because the animals represent about 25 percent of all of the UK's native mammal species and can be a canary-in-the-coal-mine, ecologically...

Echoes And Algorithm 3D Map Of Room
2013-06-19 08:35:25

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers have developed a new algorithm that makes it possible to map the shape and dimensions of a room using just a few microphones and a snap of the fingers. Developed at the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, the algorithm models a room using echoes produced from sound, similar to the way in which bats and dolphins emit sounds in order to navigate. This...

High-Pitched Echolocation Helps Harbor Porpoises Avoid Killer Whales
2013-06-12 14:17:20

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from the University of Southern Denmark (SDU) have determined why harbour porpoises are doing so well in coastal and busy waters. The team wrote in the journal Frontiers in Physiology that these animals are able to thrive through the Northern Hemisphere due to their sophisticated echolocation abilities. Coastal waters like the ones harbor porpoises live in can be challenging for whales due to the risk of beaching and...

Blind People Can Learn To Use Their Inner Bat
2013-05-21 05:51:25

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers have known for a long time that blind and visually impaired people rely on other senses. A new study led by the University of Southampton, however, now shows that they have the potential to use echolocation, similar to that of bats and dolphins, to determine the location of an object. The researchers examined how hearing, particularly the hearing of echoes, could help blind people with spatial awareness and navigation....

World's Most Extreme Hearing Animal Discovered By Researchers
2013-05-08 14:45:58

University of Strathclyde Researchers at the University of Strathclyde have discovered that the greater wax moth is capable of sensing sound frequencies of up to 300kHz — the highest recorded frequency sensitivity of any animal in the natural world. Humans are only capable of hearing sounds of 20kHz maximum, dropping to around 12-15kHz as we age, and even dolphins, known exponents of ultrasound, can't compete as their limitations are around 160kHz. The research, conducted at...

Detailing The Evolution Of Echolocation In River Dolphins
2013-04-05 13:51:23

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study by researchers from researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) and Aarhus University in Denmark is focusing on one of the most endangered animal species currently known: the river dolphin. The Ganges river dolphin, after having diverged from other toothed whale species some 30 million years ago, is thought to be one of the oldest species of aquatic animals to employ the technique of echolocation, or...

Bats Undisturbed By Forest Fires
2013-03-08 09:07:56

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Forest fires are responsible for laying waste to entire ecosystems. As the flames rush through, animals attempt to make their escape, seeking shelter in less incendiary locales. Charred remains of trees and ground cover are completely unsuitable for sustaining the life of the animals that once called the area home. However, a new study led by bat ecologist Winifred Frick of the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) reports the...


Latest Animal echolocation Reference Libraries

Brandt’s Bat, Myitus brandtii
2013-10-11 08:07:41

The Brandt’s bat has a large population in northwest of England but is endangered in Austria. The Brandt’s Bat has shaggy brown fur with a pale grey belly. This bat is not a large bat and weighs less than half an ounce and measures up to two inches long. Its wingspan is more than triple its body length at 7.5 to 9.5 inches. Brandt’s bat eats only insects (insectivorous) and is not blind. However, echolocation is used for “night-vision,” so that while hunting at night it does...

Common Noctule, Nyctalus noctula
2013-09-17 13:48:36

The common noctule bat is commonly found in Europe, Asia, and North Africa. This bat has a body length of three inches with a wingspan of approximately 14 inches. It is the largest bat found in Europe. It commonly lives in forests but due to human growth there have been populations found in towns dwelling in buildings such as church steeples. The common noctule starts to hunt and fly at dusk which is earlier than other members of the species. These bats fly at speeds up to 31 miles per...

New Zealand lesser short-tailed bat, Mystacina tuberculata
2013-09-17 13:41:27

The lesser short-tailed bat is only found in New Zealand and is the only living species of bat in the Mystacinidae Family. The short-tail is commonly located on the North Island of New Zealand using the forests as its habitat. Roosting is done primarily alone but there have been known colonies of over 100 bats. It prefers to use already hollowed trees or crevices but will chew out a burrow in the wood using its sharp incisor teeth. These roosting locations are only used for a few weeks...

Greater Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum
2012-09-03 06:50:52

The greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) can be found in Japan, Africa, Europe, China, South Asia, Korea, and Australia. It prefers a habitat in warm regions, with open scrub and trees, human settlements, and bodies of water like ponds. It will also inhabit older orchards, glades within woodlands, and permanent pastures, among other areas. Many of its roosts occur in houses in the northern areas of its range and in caves in the southern areas of its range. These bats travel to...

Mehely's Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus mehelyi
2012-08-29 12:52:07

Mehely’s horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus mehelyi) can be found in areas of the Middle East and Eastern Europe, and has a fragmented range. It lives in caves, with a preference for limestone caves with a nearby body of water. It will sometimes roost with other species of horseshoe bats within these caves. It is a medium sized bat, with pale lips and dense fur.  The fur is typically whitish gray in color, with darker fur appearing on the back and lighter fur appearing on the underbelly. As is...

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Word of the Day
lambent
  • Licking.
  • Hence Running along or over a surface, as if in the act of licking; flowing over or along; lapping or bathing; softly bright; gleaming.
This word comes the Latin 'lambere,' to lick.
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