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Latest Animal echolocation Stories

science-032312-005
2012-03-23 07:01:22

In the dark world of the underwater ocean, whales need to locate their prey accurately and quickly. In low-vision conditions whales use echolocation to find fish swimming nearby, and now it has been discovered that they can focus their acoustical “vision” to accurately located slightly differing objects. For this study, Laura Kloepper from the University of Hawaii and her her PhD supervisor, Paul Nachtigall, utilized the help of Kina the False Killer Whale, a species related to...

2012-03-22 11:10:01

False killer whales focus echolocation clicks Hunting in the ocean's murky depths, vision is of little use, so toothed whales and dolphins (odontocetes) rely on echolocation to locate tasty morsels with incredible precision. Laura Kloepper from the University of Hawaii, USA, explains that odontocetes produce their distinctive echolocation clicks in nasal structures in the forehead and broadcast them through a fat-filled acoustic lens, called the melon. 'Studies by other people showed...

2012-03-01 20:30:00

Nesting season for birds is right around the corner. With it, homeowners and facility managers will be dealing with pest bird problems and looking for solutions. Ornithologist Dr. Rob Fergus weighs in on Ultrasonic Bird Control Devices to warn consumers during this time that ultrasonic devices do not repel birds. Dr. Fergus specializes in urban bird control and effective, humane solutions. Mission Viejo, CA (PRWEB) March 01, 2012 Spring and nesting season for birds is right around the...

2012-01-09 19:39:42

Pacific Southwest Research Station/USDA Forest Service Science that makes a difference... An interactive tool developed by researchers from the USDA Forest Service´s Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) will help wind energy facility operators make informed decisions on efficient ways to reduce impacts on migratory bats. Fatalities of migratory bats at wind energy facilities have become a frequent occurrence. Bat migration patterns are poorly understood and the relationship...

2012-01-03 22:05:58

New research reveals a right-hemispheric bias in bats when it comes to tackling navigation and a left-hemispheric advantage for communication Imagine listening to music while carrying on a conversation with friends. This type of multi-tasking is fairly easy to do, right? That's because our brains efficiently and effectively separate the auditory signals — music to the right side; conversation to the left. But what researchers have not been able to do in humans or animals is to see a...

2011-11-28 15:15:07

By placing real and virtual objects in the flight paths of bats, scientists at the Universities of Bristol and Munich have shed new light on how echolocation works. Their research is published today in Behavioral Processes. The researchers found that it is not the intensity of the echoes that tells the bats the size of an object but the 'sonar aperture', that is the spread of angles from which echoes impinge on their ears. Echolocating bats emit calls for orientation. These calls bounce...

Bats, Dolphins, And Mole Rats Provide Ultrasound Inspriation
2011-11-15 04:10:40

TAU researchers look to animal "return signals" to shape medical and military advances Sonar and ultrasound, which use sound as a navigational device and to paint accurate pictures of an environment, are the basis of countless technologies, including medical ultrasound machines and submarine navigation systems. But when it comes to more accurate sonar and ultrasound, animals' "biosonar" capabilities still have the human race beat. But not for long. In a new project that studies bats,...

2011-10-25 19:00:00

Caroline DeLong, an assistant professor of psychology at Rochester Institute of Technology, is researching object discrimination in goldfish and echolocation in dolphins to bring scientists closer to unlocking the mysteries of animal perception and cognition. (PRWEB) October 25, 2011 The fictitious storybook character Dr. Doolittle was known for talking with animals. Caroline DeLong, an assistant professor of psychology at Rochester Institute of Technology, is a real-life Doolittle whose...

Bats Have Fastest Known Mammal Muscle
2011-09-30 05:04:01

Bats derive their ability to use echolocation, the bouncing of sound waves off objects to produce an accurate representation of the environment in total darkness, from so-called “superfast” muscles, researchers reported in latest issue of the journal Science. These superfast muscles, which are located in the bats´ larynx, are a physical trait never before seen in mammals, and allow the bate to make a rapid series of calls as they home in on their prey.   They...


Latest Animal echolocation Reference Libraries

Brandt’s Bat, Myitus brandtii
2013-10-11 08:07:41

The Brandt’s bat has a large population in northwest of England but is endangered in Austria. The Brandt’s Bat has shaggy brown fur with a pale grey belly. This bat is not a large bat and weighs less than half an ounce and measures up to two inches long. Its wingspan is more than triple its body length at 7.5 to 9.5 inches. Brandt’s bat eats only insects (insectivorous) and is not blind. However, echolocation is used for “night-vision,” so that while hunting at night it does...

Common Noctule, Nyctalus noctula
2013-09-17 13:48:36

The common noctule bat is commonly found in Europe, Asia, and North Africa. This bat has a body length of three inches with a wingspan of approximately 14 inches. It is the largest bat found in Europe. It commonly lives in forests but due to human growth there have been populations found in towns dwelling in buildings such as church steeples. The common noctule starts to hunt and fly at dusk which is earlier than other members of the species. These bats fly at speeds up to 31 miles per...

New Zealand lesser short-tailed bat, Mystacina tuberculata
2013-09-17 13:41:27

The lesser short-tailed bat is only found in New Zealand and is the only living species of bat in the Mystacinidae Family. The short-tail is commonly located on the North Island of New Zealand using the forests as its habitat. Roosting is done primarily alone but there have been known colonies of over 100 bats. It prefers to use already hollowed trees or crevices but will chew out a burrow in the wood using its sharp incisor teeth. These roosting locations are only used for a few weeks...

Greater Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum
2012-09-03 06:50:52

The greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) can be found in Japan, Africa, Europe, China, South Asia, Korea, and Australia. It prefers a habitat in warm regions, with open scrub and trees, human settlements, and bodies of water like ponds. It will also inhabit older orchards, glades within woodlands, and permanent pastures, among other areas. Many of its roosts occur in houses in the northern areas of its range and in caves in the southern areas of its range. These bats travel to...

Mehely's Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus mehelyi
2012-08-29 12:52:07

Mehely’s horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus mehelyi) can be found in areas of the Middle East and Eastern Europe, and has a fragmented range. It lives in caves, with a preference for limestone caves with a nearby body of water. It will sometimes roost with other species of horseshoe bats within these caves. It is a medium sized bat, with pale lips and dense fur.  The fur is typically whitish gray in color, with darker fur appearing on the back and lighter fur appearing on the underbelly. As is...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'karpos', fruit.
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