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Latest Animal echolocation Stories

2011-09-14 11:32:47

A new study reveals that the way fruit bats use biosonar to 'see' their surroundings is significantly more advanced than first thought. The study, published September 13 in the online, open access journal PLoS Biology, examines Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus), which use echolocation to orient inside their caves and to find fruit hidden in the branches of trees. Their high-frequency clicks form a sonar beam that spreads across a fan-shaped area, and the returning echoes allow them...

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2011-08-23 18:53:14

  Scientists affiliated with the University of Michigan found that skewed skulls may have helped early whales find the direction of sounds in water. Asymmetric skulls are a well-known characteristic of the modern whale group known as "odontocetes" or toothed whales. These whales have modified nasal structures that help produce high-frequency sounds for echolocation. The other modern whale group known as "masticates," or baleen whales, has symmetrical skulls and does not...

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2011-07-31 07:15:59

In a paper published recently in the journal Science, researchers at Brown University and from the Republic of Georgia have learned how bats can home in on a target, virtually dismissing other objects in their midst. The trick lies in their neurons: Bats can separate a cavalcade of echoes returning from their sonar blasts by distinguishing changes in amplitude "” the intensity of the sound "” between different parts of each echo within 1.5 decibels, to decide whether the object is...

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2011-07-29 14:11:15

Scientists have found a rainforest vine that has evolved dish-shaped leaves to attract the bats that pollinate it. Tests found that the leaves were supremely efficient at bouncing back the sound pulses the flying mammals used to navigate. The bats were found to be able to locate the plant when the leaves were present twice as quickly as when they were removed. This study is the first to find a plant with "specialized acoustic features" to help bat pollinators find them using sound. Bats...

2011-07-28 23:19:02

The researchers discovered that a rainforest vine, pollinated by bats, has evolved dish-shaped leaves with such conspicuous echoes that nectar-feeding bats can find its flowers twice as fast by echolocation. The study is published today in Science. While it is well known that the bright colours of flowers serve to attract visually-guided pollinators such as bees and birds, little research has been done to see whether plants which rely on echolocating bats for pollination and seed dispersal...

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2011-06-08 07:24:23

Dolphins and porpoises use echolocation for hunting and orientation. By sending out high-frequency sound, known as ultrasound, dolphins can use the echoes to determine what type of object the sound beam has hit. Researchers from Sweden and the US have now discovered that dolphins can generate two sound beam projections simultaneously. "The beam projections have different frequencies and can be sent in different directions. The advantage is probably that the dolphin can locate the object more...

2011-05-30 07:22:25

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Everybody has heard about echolocation in bats and dolphins. These creatures emit bursts of sounds and listen to the echoes that bounce back to detect objects in their environment. What is less well known is that people can echolocate, too. In fact, there are blind people who have learned to make clicks with their mouths and to use the returning echoes from those clicks to sense their surroundings. Some of these people are so adept at echolocation that they can use this...

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2011-05-26 12:05:00

Echolocation in bats and dolphins is well known. Bursts of sounds are created and the echoes that bounce back are used to locate and detect objects in the environment. What is less well known is that people can echolocate, too. Blind people have been known to learn to make clicks with their mouths and to use the returning echoes from those clicks to sense their surroundings. Some of these people are so adept at echolocation that they can use this skill to go mountain biking, play basketball,...

2010-11-16 07:47:08

(Ivanhoe Newswire) --Tired of the old pick up line "In a room full of people all I hear is you?"  Well, research reveals that may be true. A study found that brains of bats tell some neurons to 'shush' and others to 'yell louder' in order for key sounds to be heard above background noise"”a process that may be working in humans as well. "Some neurons seemed to know to yell louder to report communication sounds over the presence of background noise," Bridget Queenan, a doctoral...

2010-11-15 13:54:56

GUMC neuroscientists find brains of bats tell some neurons to 'shush' and others to 'yell louder' in order for key sounds to be heard above background noise How do you know what to listen to? In the middle of a noisy party, how does a mother suddenly focus on a child's cry, even if it isn't her own? Bridget Queenan, a doctoral candidate in neuroscience at Georgetown University Medical Center is turning to mustached bats to help her solve this puzzle. At the annual meeting of the Society for...


Latest Animal echolocation Reference Libraries

Brandt’s Bat, Myitus brandtii
2013-10-11 08:07:41

The Brandt’s bat has a large population in northwest of England but is endangered in Austria. The Brandt’s Bat has shaggy brown fur with a pale grey belly. This bat is not a large bat and weighs less than half an ounce and measures up to two inches long. Its wingspan is more than triple its body length at 7.5 to 9.5 inches. Brandt’s bat eats only insects (insectivorous) and is not blind. However, echolocation is used for “night-vision,” so that while hunting at night it does...

Common Noctule, Nyctalus noctula
2013-09-17 13:48:36

The common noctule bat is commonly found in Europe, Asia, and North Africa. This bat has a body length of three inches with a wingspan of approximately 14 inches. It is the largest bat found in Europe. It commonly lives in forests but due to human growth there have been populations found in towns dwelling in buildings such as church steeples. The common noctule starts to hunt and fly at dusk which is earlier than other members of the species. These bats fly at speeds up to 31 miles per...

New Zealand lesser short-tailed bat, Mystacina tuberculata
2013-09-17 13:41:27

The lesser short-tailed bat is only found in New Zealand and is the only living species of bat in the Mystacinidae Family. The short-tail is commonly located on the North Island of New Zealand using the forests as its habitat. Roosting is done primarily alone but there have been known colonies of over 100 bats. It prefers to use already hollowed trees or crevices but will chew out a burrow in the wood using its sharp incisor teeth. These roosting locations are only used for a few weeks...

Greater Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum
2012-09-03 06:50:52

The greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) can be found in Japan, Africa, Europe, China, South Asia, Korea, and Australia. It prefers a habitat in warm regions, with open scrub and trees, human settlements, and bodies of water like ponds. It will also inhabit older orchards, glades within woodlands, and permanent pastures, among other areas. Many of its roosts occur in houses in the northern areas of its range and in caves in the southern areas of its range. These bats travel to...

Mehely's Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus mehelyi
2012-08-29 12:52:07

Mehely’s horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus mehelyi) can be found in areas of the Middle East and Eastern Europe, and has a fragmented range. It lives in caves, with a preference for limestone caves with a nearby body of water. It will sometimes roost with other species of horseshoe bats within these caves. It is a medium sized bat, with pale lips and dense fur.  The fur is typically whitish gray in color, with darker fur appearing on the back and lighter fur appearing on the underbelly. As is...

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