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Latest Animal physiology Stories

fever origins
2014-08-28 03:00:29

David Engblom, Linköping University Fever is a response to inflammation, and is triggered by an onset of the signaling substance prostaglandin. Researchers at Linköping University can now see precisely where these substances are produced – a discovery that paves the way for smarter drugs. When you take an aspirin, all production of prostaglandins in the body is suppressed. All symptoms of inflammation are eased simultaneously, including fever, pain and loss of appetite. But it might...

sweat tattoo
2014-08-14 05:54:29

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Tattoos have been used for many purposes over the years. In ancient times, and in indigenous cultures, they have been representations of status and position. In our more recent past, they were used by sailors, soldiers and bikers to show membership in a "club." Today, they serve cosmetic purposes from covering scars to wearable art. It makes one wonder what the future of tattoos might be. A new study, presented at the 248th National...

2014-08-08 23:05:37

Important Summer Tips for Dehydration Prevention by Bio Logic Aqua Research Founder Sharon Kleyne Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) August 08, 2014 Summer is the hiking season in much of the United States and nearly every hiker knows to carry and drink plenty of water in warm summer weather. Hikers are also aware that drinking too little water on a hike can result in serious dehydration and even heat stroke. According to Sharon Kleyne, host of the radio show Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water, there...

2014-07-24 10:31:21

Northwestern University Intervention strategy helps parents nurture children and reduce inflammation A new Northwestern University study suggests that an intervention focused on strengthening families can reduce inflammation, a chronic over activation of parts of the immune system that is important for long-term health. Children of low socioeconomic status (SES) often experience such inflammation and poorer health at all stages of life than their more advantaged peers -- from lower...

2014-07-09 11:17:04

NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke NIH-funded researchers find brain tumor cells disrupt the brain's protective barrier, offering potential avenues for therapy Invading glioblastoma cells may hijack cerebral blood vessels during early stages of disease progression and damage the brain's protective barrier, a study in mice indicates. This finding could ultimately lead to new ways to bring about the death of the tumor, as therapies may be able to reach these...

NIH Gives Advice Hyperthermia For Older Adults
2014-07-03 03:40:07

National Institutes Of Health During the summer, it is important for everyone, especially older adults and people with chronic medical conditions, to be aware of the dangers of hyperthermia. The National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the NIH, has some tips to help mitigate some of the dangers. Hyperthermia is an abnormally high body temperature caused by a failure of the heat-regulating mechanisms in the body to deal with the heat coming from the environment. Heat stroke, heat...

Dinosaurs Took A Middle Road Between Warm- And Cold-Blooded
2014-06-13 09:10:26

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online There has been a long-standing debate over dinosaurs: were they cold-blooded like modern day reptiles or warm-blooded like mammals? In the early days of science, and in Hollywood, these prehistoric beasts were depicted as slow, lumbering giants as they were believed to be cold-blooded. But over the past few decades, these animals have been portrayed as swift-moving lizards, more reminiscent of warm-blooded behaviors. New...

Wintertime Survival For Siberian Hamsters Depends On Summertime Cholesterol Consumption
2014-06-11 03:54:52

University of Chicago Press Journals Increasingly, scientific findings indicate that an organism's diet affects more than just general health and body condition. In an article published in a forthcoming issue of the journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, researchers from Nicolaus Copernicus University have found evidence that the diet of some animals must include cholesterol in order for them to enter necessary periods of energy conservation known as torpor. Torpor is a...

2014-06-05 13:21:24

VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology) Researchers at VIB and Ghent University have unraveled the mechanism of necroptosis. This is a type of cell death that plays a crucial role in numerous diseases, from viral infections and loss of auditory nerve cells to multiple sclerosis, acute heart failure and organ transplantation. Having detailed knowledge of the cell death process enables a targeted search for new drugs. Peter Vandenabeele (VIB/UGent): "The molecular mechanism of...

2014-04-08 12:30:53

DUBLIN, April 8, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Research and Markets ( http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/6d9skh/drug_delivery_in) has announced the addition of a new report "Drug Delivery in Central Nervous System Diseases - Technologies, Markets and Companies" [http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/6d9skh/drug_delivery_in ] to their offering. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769 ) The delivery of drugs to central nervous system (CNS)...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.