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Latest Animal physiology Stories

2010-10-18 08:33:09

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- After women exercise, they generally glow with radiance.  On the other hand, after men exercise, they usually look like he just got out of the pool.  A recent study in Japan looks at the differences between men and women's response to changes in exercise intensity and how men are more effective sweaters in those regards.  Regardless of the difference between sexes, researchers say women 'shouldn't sweat it.' Researchers that Osaka University and Kobe...

2010-10-15 17:09:01

research published in Science Researchers at the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine are using an innovative new imaging technique to study how white blood cells (called neutrophils) respond to inflammation, and have revealed new targets to inhibit the response. When the body is invaded by infection, the immune system counters by generating inflammation with deployment of white blood cells to the site of danger to kill invading bacteria. However, inappropriate inflammation occurs in the...

2010-10-14 13:36:40

While the blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects the brain from harmful chemicals occurring naturally in the blood, it also obstructs the transport of drugs to the brain. In an article in Nature scientists at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet now present a potential solution to the problem. The key to the BBB is a cell-type in the blood vessel walls called pericytes, and the researchers hope that their findings will one day contribute to new therapies for diseases like...

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2010-10-08 13:25:00

Women have to work harder than men in order to start sweating, while men are more effective sweaters during exercise, according to new research published in the journal Experimental Physiology. The study by Japanese scientists at Osaka International University and Kobe University looked at differences between men and women's sweating response to changes in exercise intensity. The researchers asked four groups of subjects (trained and untrained females, trained and untrained males) to cycle...

2010-10-04 22:38:26

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that muscle inflammation after acute muscle injury is essential to muscle repair by means of insulin-like growth factor-1 A new research study published in The FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org) may change how sports injuries involving muscle tissue are treated, as well as how much patient monitoring is necessary when potent anti-inflammatory drugs are prescribed for a long time. That's because the study shows for the first time that inflammation...

2010-09-22 14:09:05

Scientists are reporting the development and successful initial testing of a new form of methotrexate "” the mainstay anticancer drug "” designed to be given as nose drops rather than injected. It shows promise as a more effective treatment for brain cancer, they say. The report appears in ACS' Molecular Pharmaceutics, a bi-monthly journal. Tomotaka Shingaki and colleagues note that brain cancer is difficult to treat, partly because current anticancer drugs have difficulty...

2010-09-07 15:48:05

Inflammation is associated with lower intelligence and premature death, according to Swedish scientists from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. "Those with low-grade inflammation performed more poorly on standardised intelligence tests, even after excluding those with signs of current illness. Inflammation also predicted an increased risk of premature death," said lead researcher Dr Hakan Karlsson. The research, recently published in External link Brain, Behavior and Immunity...

2010-09-07 08:35:42

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ Many bone fractures don't heal completely or properly, but this new model shows why fractures aren't healing properly and how they can be treated to restart the healing process and produce a strong healthy bone. About 5 to 10 percent of bone fractures the healing process doesn't succeed in fully repairing the bone, which leads to non-unions- failure of a fracture to unite and heal. Using an animal model mimicking a clinical non-union situation and a mathematical...

2010-08-06 17:11:15

In 2003, a massive heat wave struck and killed some 30,000 people in Europe in an area where heat was not considered a major threat. Similar mass die-offs occur in wild birds and some mammals during heat waves, but unlike humans, birds may not be able to take shelter or find fresh water in order to survive devastating heat. What is the outlook for desert bird communities in light of expected global temperature increases on Earth? Blair Wolf, an associate professor of biology at the University...

2010-07-21 12:53:04

A long-standing question in bone biology has been answered: It is the spindly extensions of bone cells that sense mechanical stimulation and signal the release of bone-growth factors, according to research from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The study, reported this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, offers an important clue for developing therapies to treat the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis and bone...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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