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Latest Animal sexual behaviour Stories

2013-09-25 10:56:18

Male fruit flies like to have a variety of sexual partners, whereas females prefer to stick with the same mate – or move on to his brothers. An Oxford University study of mating preferences in fruit flies (Drosophila) has found that males and females respond to the sexual familiarity of potential mates in fundamentally different ways. While male fruit flies preferred to court an unknown female over their previous mate or her sisters, female fruit flies displayed a predilection for...

Promiscuousness Results In Genetic Trade-up, More Offspring
2011-09-01 10:23:31

  It's all about the grandkids! That's what a team led by an Indiana University biologist has learned about promiscuous female birds and why they mate outside their social pair. Many humans find the idea of mating for life a romantic ideal, but in the natural world, non-monogamous relationships may have their benefits. According to new research published online Aug. 31 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, IU postdoctoral research associate Nicole Gerlach and colleagues have...

2009-07-07 08:53:25

Swiss scientists say they've found male seahorses have a strong preference for large females so as to have more and bigger eggs, as well as larger offspring. Beat Mattle and Tony Wilson of the Zoological Museum at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, said seahorses have an unusual mode of reproduction: male pregnancy. And male seahorses provide all post-fertilization parental care, yet despite the high levels of paternal investment, they have long been thought to have conventional sex...

2009-04-22 10:16:11

The extent to which sexual harassment from males can damage relationships between females is revealed in a study published today (Wednesday 22 April). Led by the Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour at the University of Exeter and published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the research uncovers the effect of sexual harassment on the ability of female fish to form social bonds with each other. The study focused on guppies, a popular aquarium fish, in which scientists have...

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2008-02-11 09:10:00

This Valentine's Day, Cupid won't be making a stop at the Smithsonian's National Zoo. Unlike the spontaneous attraction that most humans equate with love and romance, mating and dating at the National Zoo is planned, strategic and science-based -- quite an unromantic encounter. Successful breeding is often much more complicated than putting a male and female together and expecting nature to take its course. Animals in captivity need to be managed carefully to ensure the most genetically...

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2007-05-10 06:00:00

By Roughgarden, Joan May a biologist in these polarized times dare suggest that Darwin is a bit wrong about anything? Even worse, does a biologist risk insult, ridicule, anger, and intimidation to suggest that Darwin is incorrect on a big issue? We have a test case before us. Darwin appears completely mistaken in his theory of sex roles, a subject called the 'theory of sexual selection.'1 In his 1871 book The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex, Darwin wrote : "Males of almost...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.