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Latest Animal sexuality Stories

Owl Monkeys Don't Cheat
2014-03-19 14:44:02

University of Pennsylvania Intensive fathering plays a role True monogamy is rare in the animal kingdom. Even in species that appear to "mate for life," genetic maternity and paternity tests have revealed that philandering often takes place. Yet a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers shows that Azara's owl monkeys (Aotus azarae) are unusually faithful. The investigation of 35 offspring born to 17 owl monkey pairs turned up no evidence of cheating; the male and female...

Male Lizards Steer Clear Of Females With Similar Throat Bands
2013-11-07 06:11:53

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A team of researchers from Penn State University recently examined the relationship between body-color patterning and mating behavior in fence lizards, Sceloporus undulatus, which are found ranging across the Eastern US. Tracy Langkilde, an associate professor of biology at Penn State University, and Lindsey Swierk, a graduate student in Langkilde’s lab, found that the sex lives of these lizards are more complicated than you might...

Monogamous Owl Monkeys Reproduce More Than Those With Multiple Partners
2013-01-25 11:12:27

University of Pennsylvania Breaking up is hard to do – and can be detrimental to one´s reproductive fitness, according to a new University of Pennsylvania study. Focusing on wide-eyed, nocturnal owl monkeys, considered a socially monogamous species, the research reveals that, when an owl monkey pair is severed by an intruding individual, the mate who takes up with a new partner produces fewer offspring than a monkey who sticks with its tried-and-true partner. The findings...

Distinctive Male Peacock Love Call Allures Females From Afar
2012-12-21 12:05:04

[Watch Video: Male Peacock Demonstrates 'Hoot-Dash Display'] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The distinctive sound made by male peacocks just before mating attracts female voyeurs for reasons currently unknown, a Duke University researcher has discovered. The India peafowl's unique pre-copulation ritual, which is also referred to as the "hoot-dash display," involves the male members of the Phasianinae family dashing toward a female companion and squawking...

Zebrafish Perform Colorful Courtship Displays
2012-11-30 14:58:35

University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna Billy Ocean may not have been thinking of fish when he wrote “The Color of Love”, but Sophie Hutter, Attila Hettyey, Dustin Penn, and Sarah Zala from the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna were able to show that zebrafish males and females both wear their brightest colors while wooing a mate. Elaborate secondary sexual displays are often overlooked because many species attract mates...

Mating Plugs Produced By Female Spiders To Prevent Unwanted Sex From Males
2012-08-05 10:30:36

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A new mechanism of animal mating plug production has been discovered by scientists at the Smithsonian and their colleagues. In the giant wood spider (Nephila pilipes), which is a highly sexually dimorphic and polygamous species, many small males will compete with each other for their chance with a few large females. These males have been known to sever their own genitals during mating in order to plug the female, gain paternity and...

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2012-07-09 10:05:52

John Neumann for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A team of biologists from Tufts University in Boston may have answered the question of what attracts fireflies to each other. Dr. Adam South, with supervision from colleague Sara Lewis, who have been studying fireflies for 20 years, used LED lights to mimic the flashes of amorous male fireflies. In the wild, females are very picky about what males they reveal themselves to during this part of the courtship routine. Females will only...

2012-05-28 19:26:11

Faithful females who choose good providers key to evolutionary shift to modern family, study finds In early human evolution, when faithful females began to choose good providers as mates, pair-bonding replaced promiscuity, laying the foundation for the emergence of the institution of the modern family, a new study finds. The study helps answer long-standing questions in evolutionary biology about how the modern family, characterized by intense, social attachments with exclusive mates,...

2012-05-03 09:43:47

In most species, females prefer the most intense courtship display males can muster, but a new study finds that female cowbirds actually prefer less intense displays. The full results are published May 2 in the open access journal PLoS ONE. The researchers, led by Adrian O'Loghlen of University of California Santa Barbara, write that males direct more intense wing-spreading displays toward other males as aggressive communicative signals. It appears, however, that while these signals may...

Promiscuousness Results In Genetic Trade-up, More Offspring
2011-09-01 10:23:31

  It's all about the grandkids! That's what a team led by an Indiana University biologist has learned about promiscuous female birds and why they mate outside their social pair. Many humans find the idea of mating for life a romantic ideal, but in the natural world, non-monogamous relationships may have their benefits. According to new research published online Aug. 31 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, IU postdoctoral research associate Nicole Gerlach and colleagues have...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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