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Latest Animals Stories

Image 1 - Researchers Find Evidence That Pythons Are Eating Bird Eggs
2012-04-07 04:52:03

Burmese pythons, which have already been observed attacking birds in the Florida Everglades, have now been seen eating those birds' eggs directly from the nest, according to new research from the Smithsonian Institution. According to Jennifer Welsh of LiveScience, the study, which has been published in the March issue of the journal Reptiles & Amphibians: Conservation and Natural History, details three cases in which the Smithsonian researchers discovered eggs inside of the pythons,...

2012-03-14 22:03:04

In a brainless marine worm, MBL researchers find the developmental 'scaffold' for the vertebrate brain The origin of the exquisitely complex vertebrate brain is somewhat mysterious. "In terms of evolution, it basically pops up out of nowhere. You don't see anything anatomically like it in other animals," says Ariel Pani, an investigator at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole and a graduate student at the University of Chicago. But this week in the journal Nature, Pani...

2012-02-17 11:00:41

Dicey weather could mean more marital strife for birds coping with climate change, study says Married people may pledge to stay faithful through good times and bad, but birds sing a different tune – when weather is severe or uncertain, birds are more likely to stray from their mates, says a new study by researchers working at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center and Columbia University. The results could mean more marital strife for birds coping with climate change, the...

Salt Water Alone Unlikely To Halt Burmese Python Invasion
2012-01-05 05:03:24

Invasive Burmese python hatchlings from the Florida Everglades can withstand exposure to salt water long enough to potentially expand their range through ocean and estuarine environments, according to research in the latest issue of the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. This recent study, based on lab experiments conducted by researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey,   provides initial evidence that pythons may be able to survive in marine and estuarine...

Pythons’ Huge Hearts Offer Insight For Human Heart Health
2011-10-28 05:34:09

While many people think of snakes as creepy, cold-hearted creatures that swallow their prey whole. But it turns out the reptiles actually have enormous hearts that could offer clues to treating people with cardiac disease, researchers from the University of Colorado-Boulder reported on Thursday. The surprising new study showed that the vast amounts of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstreams of feeding Burmese pythons promote healthy heart growth. The researchers found the amount of...

How Do Birds Avoid Crashes?
2011-10-28 04:15:45

The secret of how birds zip flawlessly through narrow spaces without crashing into obstacles has been unlocked by Australian scientists. Their discovery could be used to design ℠bird-safe´ buildings and windmills, and improve the versatility of pilotless aircraft. Researchers at The Vision Centre have found that birds weave rapidly and safely through dense forests and narrow corridors by using their eyes to sense the speed of background image flow on both sides and adjust...

2011-10-27 22:12:55

Identification of three fatty acids involved in the extreme growth of Burmese pythons' hearts following large meals could prove beneficial in treating diseased human hearts, according to research co-authored by a University of Alabama scientist and publishing in the Oct. 28 issue of Science. Growth of the human heart can be beneficial when resulting from exercise — a type of growth known as physiological cardiac hypertrophy — but damaging when triggered by disease —...

2011-10-27 22:06:29

Fatty acids circulating through feeding python bloodstreams promotes healthy heart growth in the constricting snakes A surprising new University of Colorado Boulder study shows that huge amounts of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstreams of feeding pythons promote healthy heart growth, results that may have implications for treating human heart disease. CU-Boulder Professor Leslie Leinwand and her research team found the amount of triglycerides -- the main constituent of natural...


Latest Animals Reference Libraries

Paralvinella sulfincola
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paralvinella sulfincola is a species of worm in the Alvinellidae family. It lives among undersea hot-water vents, thriving in the hottest of waters, at temperatures that would kill most animals. This characteristic makes it an extremophile or hyperthermophile. Having the unique ability to withstand extremely hot water from hydrothermal openings enables this stalk-like worm to feed on bacteria that other animals cannot reach. It is difficult to know exactly what temperatures this species...

Giant Feather Duster Worm, Eudistylia polymorpha
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Giant Feather Duster Worm (Eudistylia polymorpha) is a species of marine polychaete worm of the Sabellidae family. Its range extends along the western coast of North America, from Alaska to California. It is most commonly found in the intertidal zone in tide pools and in the neritic (coastal) zone at depths up to 1,375 feet. It is often found in groups along rocks, reefs, pilings, wharves and marinas. Its common name comes from the crown of tentacles extended when the animal is under...

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