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2011-09-24 08:44:23

The Natural History Museum in London said on Friday that it is seeking the public's advice in naming a new species of sea-dwelling worm. The unnamed worms are known as annelids and the species spends its time about 6,500 feet below the surface of the sea in Antarctic. "Our goal is to show that taxonomy, the scientific discipline of naming new species, is interesting, fun and crucial to the advancement of science," zoologist at the National History Museum, Adrian Glover, said in a press...

2011-09-15 13:03:21

Florida has the world´s worst invasive amphibian and reptile problem, and a new 20-year study led by a University of Florida researcher verifies the pet trade as the No. 1 cause of the species´ introductions. From 1863 through 2010, 137 non-native amphibian and reptile species were introduced to Florida, with about 25 percent of those traced to one animal importer. The findings appear online today in Zootaxa. “Most people in Florida don´t realize when they see an...

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2011-07-08 12:05:00

According to researchers, sex gives worms the power to fight off parasites. The researchers found that worms forced to reproduce asexually succumbed to a bacterial infection and died. The team said the results are the most convincing evidence to date for a key theory in evolutionary biology. The theory said that sex evolved because it allows organisms to reshuffle their genes into new combinations to stay a step ahead of parasites. The team said that reproducing asexually means there is no...

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2011-07-04 07:38:02

Scientists have designed a micro aircraft that will be able to flap, glide and hover like a bird. Researchers from the Biomimetics-Innovation-Centre in Germany have been inspired by birds to produce a new versatile design of Micro air vehicle (MAV) that combines flapping wings, which allow it to fly at slow speeds and hover, with the ability to glide, ensuring good quality images from any on-board camera. "In birds, the combination of demanding tasks like take-off, travelling long distances,...

2011-06-23 15:41:35

Why don't you ever see baby pigeons? For the same reason you don't see many chicks: they can't fly. It can take months for their partially developed wings and flight muscles to become airworthy, and by then the youngsters are almost fullygrown. However, long before their maiden flight, pigeon chicks probably put their developing wings to use, flapping as they run up steep branches. Brandon Jackson from the University of Montana, USA, explains that Ken Dial and his son first noticed this...

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2011-06-14 07:47:13

Sex difference in the brain varies according to social status The brains of all vertebrates display gender-related differences. In songbirds, for example, the size of the brain areas that control their singing behavior could be linked to the size of their song repertoires. In many songbird species, only the males sing and indeed, they do have larger song control areas in the brain than females. However, even species where both sexes sing identically, display the same sex differences in their...

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2011-06-03 05:45:00

Researchers unearth deepest-living animal ever found A team of researchers has discovered two species of a worm, living deeper than any other known animal on the planet, where experts previously believed no animal except single-cell bacteria could survive. The discovery of Halicephalobus mephisto, a new species of worm, and a previously known species, Plectus aquatilis, were discovered 2.2 miles below the surface in a South African gold mine thriving in sultry 118-degree Fahrenheit water...

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2011-05-02 07:50:00

To find out what motivates pigs to frolic around in the mud, a scientist in the Netherlands looked at the wallowing behavior of its wild relatives. Marc Bracke from Wageningen University and Research Centre carried out the study that suggests a pig's love of mud is not just a way to keep cool, but is vital for the animals' well-being. Pigs are known to wallow in order to keep cool because they do not have normal sweat glands to regulate their body temperature. Bracke searched through...

2011-04-25 07:10:00

PEACHTREE CITY, Ga., April 25, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Huvepharma President Glen Wilkinson announces the appointment of Dr. Amy B. Batal as Director of Technical Services-Poultry. Previously, Dr. Batal was Associate Professor of Poultry Nutrition at the University of Georgia, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Poultry Science Department. Dr. Batal is a renowned expert in the field of poultry nutrition and a regular speaker at industry conferences worldwide. She has published...


Latest Animals Reference Libraries

Paralvinella sulfincola
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paralvinella sulfincola is a species of worm in the Alvinellidae family. It lives among undersea hot-water vents, thriving in the hottest of waters, at temperatures that would kill most animals. This characteristic makes it an extremophile or hyperthermophile. Having the unique ability to withstand extremely hot water from hydrothermal openings enables this stalk-like worm to feed on bacteria that other animals cannot reach. It is difficult to know exactly what temperatures this species...

Giant Feather Duster Worm, Eudistylia polymorpha
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Giant Feather Duster Worm (Eudistylia polymorpha) is a species of marine polychaete worm of the Sabellidae family. Its range extends along the western coast of North America, from Alaska to California. It is most commonly found in the intertidal zone in tide pools and in the neritic (coastal) zone at depths up to 1,375 feet. It is often found in groups along rocks, reefs, pilings, wharves and marinas. Its common name comes from the crown of tentacles extended when the animal is under...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.