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2009-08-03 14:47:31

The fossilized tracks of a giant marine worm that lived some 475 million years ago have been discovered byt the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC). Evidence of the worm, which was up to 3 feet in length, was found in the Cabaneros National Park in central Spain.  The region was once a seabed during the Lower Ordovician period, the Spanish researchers said. The CSIC said the worms dwelled within horizontal galleries 15 feet long and 6-8 inches in diameter under the seabed.  The...

2009-07-31 14:28:16

Florida wildlife authorities said a 17-foot, 2-inch Burmese python was captured and destroyed on a private property in Okeechobee County. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said the 207-pound reptile, which was captured and killed Thursday, did not have a pet microchip required for those snakes considered reptiles of concern, the Orlando (Fla.) Sentinel reported Friday. "Its stomach contents were examined, but nothing identifiable was found inside,'' the commission said in...

2009-07-26 13:41:30

A wildlife expert says a 14-foot python he removed from a drainage pipe in Manatee County, Fla., is so angry it may have to be put down. Matthews Wildlife Rescue executive director Justin Matthews said while attempting to remove the large Burmese python from the 2-foot-wide pipe Saturday, he was forced to stun the animal because it was so angry, the Bradenton (Fla.) Herald reported. Matthews said the potential danger of the angry python may make the snake unusable in educational efforts...

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2009-07-17 11:45:00

Scientists have discovered that a tiny lizard drifts slowly to the ground like a feather when it falls.  Looking from the outside, the neon blue tailed tree lizards (Holaspis guentheri) seem adapted to flying, gliding or moving through the air as they go from branch to branch in the trees of the African forest. There have even been stories about the African tree lizard gliding through the air. However, lacking the apparent adaptations necessary to upgrade their moves from a leap to a...

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2009-07-09 07:46:42

Catching adult eagles for research is a difficult task, so scientists at Purdue University say they are using eagle feathers to learn more about the birds. Many birds are small, easy to catch and abundant, Associate Professor Andrew DeWoody, who is leading the study, said. With eagles, the effort can be 100 to 1,000 times greater than catching chickadees. Not only do eagles, with their sharp talons and beaks, pose a physical threat to the scientists, but the birds can badly injure themselves...

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2009-06-25 14:11:34

Experts at the Savannah River Ecology Lab in South Carolina are monitoring a group of exotic pythons to determine whether or not they would be able to survive a northward migration. Each of the ten pythons was found in Florida, where the slithering reptiles have been thriving since 1992. Scientists have implanted radio transmitters to gauge the pythons' body temperature and overall wellbeing in the 400-feet pit. The test could show how possible it would be for Burmese python populations to...

2009-06-12 14:22:04

Post-doctoral researcher finds birds alter songs in reaction to habitat change Elizabeth Derryberry, post-doctoral researcher at the LSU Museum of Natural Science, has found a link between alterations in bird songs and the rapid change in the surrounding habitat. Her research will be featured in the July 2009 issue of the American Naturalist.Derryberry, a behavioral ecologist, has studied this phenomenon since her time as a graduate student at Duke University, where she discovered tapes from...

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2009-05-28 13:19:07

The "red list" of the UK's most threatened bird species has another entry: the cuckoo, BBC News reported. The cuckoo, known for its springtime song, has joined a long list of area birds such as the lapwing, yellow wagtail and herring gull, all of which have been deemed to be urgently in need of conservation action. Since 2002, the number of red-listed birds in the UK has risen by 5 percent to more than one in five. In the latest assessment of the UK's bird population, the RSPB said the...

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2009-05-19 11:25:00

Researchers say mockingbirds can tell humans apart and are quick to react to those they don't like, The Associated Press reported. The study in Tuesday's edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggested that birds rapidly learn to identify people who have previously threatened their nests "” even sounding alarms and attacking those people, while ignoring others nearby. Douglas J. Levey, a professor in the zoology department of the University of Florida, said the...

2009-05-14 14:50:07

A new study has revealed that mother birds can provide an early advantage to the chicks that they have sired with their non-social partner (known as extra-pair offspring).It has long been known that female birds commonly mate with males other than their social partner, producing broods of mixed paternity in which the interloper's "Ëœextra pair' offspring often outperform their half brothers and sisters. While the superiority of these extra-pair offspring has generally been...


Latest Animals Reference Libraries

Paralvinella sulfincola
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paralvinella sulfincola is a species of worm in the Alvinellidae family. It lives among undersea hot-water vents, thriving in the hottest of waters, at temperatures that would kill most animals. This characteristic makes it an extremophile or hyperthermophile. Having the unique ability to withstand extremely hot water from hydrothermal openings enables this stalk-like worm to feed on bacteria that other animals cannot reach. It is difficult to know exactly what temperatures this species...

Giant Feather Duster Worm, Eudistylia polymorpha
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Giant Feather Duster Worm (Eudistylia polymorpha) is a species of marine polychaete worm of the Sabellidae family. Its range extends along the western coast of North America, from Alaska to California. It is most commonly found in the intertidal zone in tide pools and in the neritic (coastal) zone at depths up to 1,375 feet. It is often found in groups along rocks, reefs, pilings, wharves and marinas. Its common name comes from the crown of tentacles extended when the animal is under...

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Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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