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2009-07-12 13:05:00

Scientists and researchers are scouring the Palouse region from eastern Washington into the Idaho panhandle in hopes of finding more of the dwindling giant Palouse earthworms, The Associated Press reported. The almost elusive worm is said to secrete a lily-like smell when handled, spit at predators, and live in burrows 15 feet deep. There have been only a handful of sightings. Even though there has been little research done on the Palouse worm, conservationists are asking the Obama...

2009-07-02 16:53:07

Experts said a popular YouTube video of a moving, slimy mass in a Raleigh, N.C., sewer depicts a colony of tubifex worms or invertebrates called byrozoan. Ed Buchan, an environmental coordinator with the Raleigh Public Utilities Department, said the video, which was posted to YouTube in April and was chosen Wednesday as the top viral video on the Internet by TV Week, depicts a colony of tubifex worms, which can form clusters of up to 1 inch in diameter, WRAL-TV, Raleigh, reported Thursday....

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2009-07-01 12:05:00

Conservationists filed a petition with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Tuesday seeking federal protection for the Palouse earthworm "” a worm that spits at its predators, The Associated Press reported. Fans of the rare, sweet-smelling species requested the worm be protected as an endangered species. Noah Greenwald of the Center for Biological Diversity said the giant Palouse earthworm is critically endangered and needs the protection of the Endangered Species Act to have any...

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2009-02-07 11:49:58

Discovery provides clues to how life thrives in extreme environments The genome of a marine bacterium living 2,500 meters below the ocean's surface is providing clues to how life adapts in extreme environments, according to a paper published Feb. 6, 2009, in the journal PLoS Genetics. The research focused on the bacterium Nautilia profundicola, a microbe that survives near deep-sea hydrothermal vents. It was found in a fleece-like lining on the backs of Pompeii worms, a type of tubeworm that...

2009-02-02 10:28:01

Charles Darwin may have been born 200 years ago come Feb. 12, but his theory of evolution remains an everyday touchstone for modern biologists. And while the Origin of Species author might not have known the term "global warming," he wouldn't have been surprised that the environment is changing. He would, however, be astonished by the speed at which it's happening today. "Every species is under temporary permanence," says Bill Saidel, an associate professor of biology at Rutgers University's...

2008-10-29 15:00:23

U.S. scientists say they've determined earthworms can change the chemical nature of the carbon in North American forest litter and soils. Purdue University scientists, along with researchers from the Smithsonian Institution and Johns Hopkins University, studied the effect of earthworms on forest chemistry by comparing carbon composition in forests that vary in earthworm activity. They found forests with greater numbers of invasive earthworms tend to have litter and soil organic matter...

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2008-09-12 12:50:00

Researchers at Reading University have found that metal-munching earthworms can help plants to clean up contaminated soils. The team noticed that subtle changes occurred in metals as worms ingested and excreted soil, making it easier for plants to take up potentially toxic metals from contaminated land. Experts suggested at the British Association Science Festival in Liverpool that earthworms could be the future "21st Century eco-warriors". The UK has many areas with contaminated soil due to...

2008-06-30 00:01:35

By Erik Robinson, The Columbian, Vancouver, Wash. Jun. 29--Say that you're a green-minded apartment or condo dweller striving to live sustainably. You've already minimized your carbon footprint by foregoing the large house and yard that characterizes much of suburbia, but the idea of composting your food scraps seems a little unwieldy. You don't have anywhere to put a composting bin the size of a trash can, much less a garden in which to plow the nutrient-rich product it creates....

2008-05-20 09:00:00

Here's an idea: Start a project with the kids that will teach them something important about how the Earth sustains itself. Set up a container for vermicomposting. (Yes, this project involves worms. But keep reading.) Vermicomposting turns kitchen waste into compost. You put worms in a container, provide the right environment, then toss your leftovers in with them. And the worms do their job, eating their way through the scraps and, as time goes by, turning all that waste into a...

2008-01-29 08:18:59

A rare 3-foot-long spitting earthworm that smells like lilies is at the heart of a legal battle between conservationists and the U.S. government. When taxonomist Frank Smith discovered the giant Palouse earthworm (Driloleirus americanus) in 1897 by, he described it as "very abundant." Nowadays, however, sightings of the worm are rare. The only recent confirmed worm sighting was made in 2005 by a University of Idaho researcher. Before that, the giant worm had not been spotted in...


Latest Annelids Reference Libraries

Christmas Tree Worm, Spirobranchus giganteus
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Christmas Tree Worm (Spirobranchus giganteus) is a species of small, tube-building polychaete worm in the Serpulidae family. It is widely distributed throughout the world’s tropical oceans, occurring abundantly from the Caribbean to the Indo-Pacific. The worm’s common and scientific nomenclature refers to the two chromatically hued spiral structures, most prominently seen by divers. These multicolored spiral structures are actually part of the worm’s highly derived respiratory...

Paralvinella sulfincola
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paralvinella sulfincola is a species of worm in the Alvinellidae family. It lives among undersea hot-water vents, thriving in the hottest of waters, at temperatures that would kill most animals. This characteristic makes it an extremophile or hyperthermophile. Having the unique ability to withstand extremely hot water from hydrothermal openings enables this stalk-like worm to feed on bacteria that other animals cannot reach. It is difficult to know exactly what temperatures this species...

Giant Feather Duster Worm, Eudistylia polymorpha
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Giant Feather Duster Worm (Eudistylia polymorpha) is a species of marine polychaete worm of the Sabellidae family. Its range extends along the western coast of North America, from Alaska to California. It is most commonly found in the intertidal zone in tide pools and in the neritic (coastal) zone at depths up to 1,375 feet. It is often found in groups along rocks, reefs, pilings, wharves and marinas. Its common name comes from the crown of tentacles extended when the animal is under...

Phytobdella catenifera
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Phytobdella catenifera is a species of leech found in Peninsular Malaysia. The specimen was first collected from a brown tortoise in 1935. One record of the species was found in Gabai Falls, Selangor and has rarely been seen since. One reason is because it only attaches to reptiles and is of no threat to humans. This 2-inch-long terrestrial leech was named by Professor John Percy Moore due to the striking chain-striped pattern on the creature’s back. Recent studies on leech genetics...

Common Clam Worm, Alitta succinea
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Common Clam Worm (Alitta succinea) is a species of marine annelid of the Nereididae family of ragworms or sandworms. It is found throughout the Northwest Atlantic Ocean, especially in the Gulf of Maine; it is also found off the coast of South Africa. This species can reach a length of 6 inches, but most specimens are smaller. It is brown in color at the rear, and reddish-brown on the rest of the body. The head has four eyes, two sensory feelers and numerous tentacles. The body consists...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.