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Latest Antarctica Stories

Zombie Worms And Shipwrecks
2013-08-14 10:30:33

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Zombie worms are coming for your bones – but probably only if they end up at the bottom of Antarctic waters. A new report in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B suggested that if a wooden ship and its crew sank in the Southern Ocean that surrounds Antarctica, any evidence of the crew would decompose long before the ship itself. That's because so-called "zombie worms" - including two newly discovered species - living at the bottom...

First Morning At Concordia Research Station In Antarctica
2013-08-09 13:01:48

ESA After three months of continuous night, morning will break on Saturday at the Concordia research station in Antarctica. The Sun last set there in May and since then, the crew have watched for the faintest glow on the horizon that hinted at the position of the Sun and that separates nighttime from day. This glow dwindled into complete darkness at the deepest point of winter in mid-June, and it has been gradually reappearing, slowly but steadily building up to the first real sunrise....

Slight Global Warming May Come From Ozone Winds
2013-08-09 08:27:56

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Laypeople tend to mix up the ozone hole and global warming. The popular belief is that the hole is a major cause of the world’s increasing average temperature. On the other hand, scientists have long attributed the ozone shortage in the hole to a small cooling trend. A new computer model study, led by the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, suggests that there might be a slight warming influence from the ozone hole. The influence is...

2013-08-01 08:34:07

Slight changes in the timing of the annual loss of sea-ice in polar regions could have dire consequences for polar ecosystems, by allowing a lot more sunlight to reach the sea floor. The research by scientists at UNSW and the Australian Antarctic Division predicts that biodiversity on some areas of the polar seabed could be reduced by as much as one third within decades, as the poles warm. The study, Light-driven tipping points in polar ecosystems, will be published in the journal...

Antarctic Permafrost Melting Faster Than Previously Thought
2013-07-24 17:51:21

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists reported in the journal Scientific Reports that permafrost in a section of Antarctica is melting faster than expected. Data from Garwood Valley in the McMurdo Dry Valleys region of Antarctica has shown that melt rates accelerated consistently from 2001 to 2012, rising to about ten times the valley's historical average for the present geologic epoch. Scientists previously thought the region's ground ice to be in equilibrium,...

Glacier Geometry Linked To Diverse Calving Patterns
2013-07-23 05:24:37

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Large stretches of ice on the coasts of Antarctica and Greenland are at risk of rapidly cracking apart and falling into the ocean in events over the coming decades that could aggravate sea level rise. The new study, published in Nature Geoscience, describes new iceberg calving simulations from the University of Michigan. "If this starts to happen and we're right, we might be closer to the higher end of sea level rise estimates for...

Ancient Antarctic Ice Melt 66 Feet
2013-07-22 08:50:47

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A large team of international researchers has looked millions of years into the Antarctic past and found evidence that massive sections of the continent's eastern ice sheet once melted to raise sea levels by around 66 feet. "Scientists previously considered the East Antarctic ice sheet to be more stable than the much smaller ice sheets in West Antarctica and Greenland, even though very few studies of East Antarctic ice...

Glass Sponge Community Thrives Despite Antarctic Ice Loss
2013-07-11 18:53:49

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The waters around Antarctica can be an inhospitable place, but a new study has shown that dynamic events in the region are constantly shaping and even boosting the ecosystems in the Southern Ocean. The study, published in Current Biology, reports on a surprisingly prolific community of glass sponges colonizing an area formerly covered by permanent ice - surprising because the sponges live long, slow lives that can extend up to 10,000...

Massive Iceberg Breaks Off Pine Island Glacier In Antarctica
2013-07-10 12:28:33

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the Earth's most watched glaciers, Pine Island Glacier (PIG), has released a massive iceberg about eight times the size of Manhattan Island, according to images released by the German Space Agency (DLR). The ice chunk was part of the PIG's ice shelf, which floats on and pushes out into the Southern Ocean for tens of miles. A relatively common occurrence that scientists aren't blaming directly on global warming, similar...

Swamp-Like Water System Revealed Under Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier
2013-07-09 14:43:50

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While using an innovative radar analysis method to accurately image the sub-glacial water system under West Antarctica's Thwaites Galcier, scientists discovered a swamp-like canal system beneath the ice. The scientists, from The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) that the swamp-like canal is several times as large as Florida's Everglades....


Latest Antarctica Reference Libraries

Mount Erebus
2014-08-19 09:49:48

Mount Erebus is an active volcano that can be found on Ross Island in Antarctica. It is the second largest volcano in Antarctica, reaching a height of 12,448 feet. Sir James Clark Ross discovered it in 1841 in mid-eruption and named it and another volcano Mount Erebus and Mount Terror, after two of his ships. The first people to climb the volcano and reach its summit were part of Sir Ernest Shackleton's party, including Professor Edgeworth David, Jameson Adams, and Dr. Eric Marshall. Mount...

Antarctica
2013-02-18 10:15:24

Antarctica is the Earths southernmost continent; it contains the geographic South Pole. It’s situated in the Antarctic area of the Southern Hemisphere, almost completely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is bordered by the Southern Ocean. It’s the fifth-largest continent at 5.4 million sq miles. On average, it is the driest, coldest, and windiest continent as well as having the highest average elevation of all the continents. Considered a desert, the annual precipitation is only 8...

Ross Seal, Ommatophoca rossii
2013-01-01 15:44:30

The Ross seal (Ommatophoca rossii) is a true seal in the Phocidae family, and can only be found on pack ice in Antarctica. This species was formally described by James Clark Ross in 1841, during his British Antarctic Expedition. It is very uncommon to see in its range and rarely leaves the pack ice, with stray individuals occurring off southeast Australia or sub-Antarctic islands. The Ross seal can reach an average length between 5.5 and 6.9 feet, although some females can reach up to 8.2...

Weddell Seal, Leptonychotes weddellii
2012-06-27 21:35:24

The Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) is a large true seal in the Lobodontini tribe. It is native to Antarctica, with its range consisting of a large “ring” that surrounds Antarctica. This seal will spend most of its time in the water instead of on land. The Weddell seal appears on the IUCN Red List with a conservation status of “Least Concern”.  It is estimated this seal numbers over 800,000 individuals in the wild. First discovered in 1820s by a British sealing captain...

Antarctic Silverfish, Pleuragramma antarcticum
2012-04-02 17:14:35

The Antarctic Silverfish, (Pleuragramma antarcticum), is a member of the Notothenioidei family of fish. It is widely distributed around the Antarctic, but has largely disappeared from the western side of the northern Antarctic Peninsula based on 2010 research funded by the National Science Foundation. It is also found throughout the Southern Ocean. It grows to an average size of 6 inches, but has been known to reach lengths of up to 10 inches. It is usually pink with a silver tint, and...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.