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Latest Antarctica Stories

Ice Cores Analysis Shows Warming And CO2 Are Closely Related
2012-07-25 08:28:23

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have always linked the increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide to a rise in global temperatures, but new research by an international team of scientists connects the cause and effect more strongly than ever before. According to their report recently published in the scientific journal Climate of the Past, the research team tested tiny bubbles of air trapped in layers of ice around Antarctica for carbon dioxide levels and...

Findings on Logistical Improvements to Support Antarctic Science Unveiled
2012-07-23 16:22:34

Report details blueprint for securing global research in Antarctica Today, the 12-member U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel, commissioned by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) released their report, More and Better Science in Antarctica through Increased Logistical Effectiveness. The report is a comprehensive document based on several months of research, containing numerous specific recommendations for the U.S....

Google Street View Brings Antarctica To A Computer Near You
2012-07-18 09:39:06

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Yesterday was the 110th anniversary of the invention of the air conditioner, so why not keep on a cool theme during the dog days of summer with a virtual trip to Antarctica? Thanks to Internet search giant Google´s controversial Street View imaging system you can now take a virtual tour of the vast icy, desolate landscape right on your desktop. While Google first included imagery from the South Pole in its 2010 Street View...

Climate In Arctic More Vulnerable Than Thought
2012-06-25 10:10:11

First analyses of the longest sediment core ever collected on land in the terrestrial Arctic provide documentation that intense warm intervals, warmer than scientists thought possible, occurred there over the past 2.8 million years First analyses of the longest sediment core ever collected on land in the terrestrial Arctic, published this week in Science, provide documentation that intense warm intervals, warmer than scientists thought possible, occurred there over the past 2.8 million...

Elephant Seals Assist In Ice Shelf Research
2012-06-22 14:47:44

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com In the Bizarro world of climate change crusaders, what is good is bad, what is up is down, and what is hot is cold. New research published this week in the American Geophysical Union journal Geophysical Research Letters asserts that an Antarctic ice shelf melting slower than expected is good news for those of us who dislike massive flooding – but bad news for those sounding the alarm against global warming. During the two-year study, researchers led...

Penguins Face Population Decline Due To Climate Change
2012-06-21 07:05:11

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com Penguins in the colder regions of the world are being threatened by man, despite man not actually being present. Two studies have pointed to climate change being the reason for why penguins that frolic in Antarctica are dying off. Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts believe that there will be an 81 percent reduction in the number of emperor penguins by 2100, bringing the population totals from 3,000 to as low as 500....

Ancient Antarctica Was A Completely Different Place
2012-06-18 04:13:26

A new university-led study with NASA participation finds ancient Antarctica was much warmer and wetter than previously suspected. The climate was suitable to support substantial vegetation -- including stunted trees -- along the edges of the frozen continent. The team of scientists involved in the study, published online June 17 in Nature Geoscience, was led by Sarah J. Feakins of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, and included researchers from NASA's Jet Propulsion...

2012-06-13 10:35:08

Proposal follows first continent-wide survey of Antarctic biogeography An international team of scientists have published the first continent-wide assessment of the Antarctic's biogeography, and propose that the landmass should be divided into 15 distinct conservation regions to protect the continent from invasive alien species. The team's findings are published in Diversity and Distributions, while the authors' proposals were outlined today at a lecture to the Antarctic Treaty...

2012-06-12 11:37:22

Review article in Physiological Reviews looks back on discoveries since R.F. Scott reached the South Pole In late 1911, British Naval Captain Robert F. Scott led a team of five Englishmen on their quest to be the first to reach the South Pole. Upon arrival they learned they had been preceded by a Norwegian team, led by Roald Amundsen (which had arrived more than a month before). Scott and his companions died during their journey home as a result of natural causes induced by the extreme...


Latest Antarctica Reference Libraries

Mount Erebus
2014-08-19 09:49:48

Mount Erebus is an active volcano that can be found on Ross Island in Antarctica. It is the second largest volcano in Antarctica, reaching a height of 12,448 feet. Sir James Clark Ross discovered it in 1841 in mid-eruption and named it and another volcano Mount Erebus and Mount Terror, after two of his ships. The first people to climb the volcano and reach its summit were part of Sir Ernest Shackleton's party, including Professor Edgeworth David, Jameson Adams, and Dr. Eric Marshall. Mount...

Antarctica
2013-02-18 10:15:24

Antarctica is the Earths southernmost continent; it contains the geographic South Pole. It’s situated in the Antarctic area of the Southern Hemisphere, almost completely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is bordered by the Southern Ocean. It’s the fifth-largest continent at 5.4 million sq miles. On average, it is the driest, coldest, and windiest continent as well as having the highest average elevation of all the continents. Considered a desert, the annual precipitation is only 8...

Ross Seal, Ommatophoca rossii
2013-01-01 15:44:30

The Ross seal (Ommatophoca rossii) is a true seal in the Phocidae family, and can only be found on pack ice in Antarctica. This species was formally described by James Clark Ross in 1841, during his British Antarctic Expedition. It is very uncommon to see in its range and rarely leaves the pack ice, with stray individuals occurring off southeast Australia or sub-Antarctic islands. The Ross seal can reach an average length between 5.5 and 6.9 feet, although some females can reach up to 8.2...

Weddell Seal, Leptonychotes weddellii
2012-06-27 21:35:24

The Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) is a large true seal in the Lobodontini tribe. It is native to Antarctica, with its range consisting of a large “ring” that surrounds Antarctica. This seal will spend most of its time in the water instead of on land. The Weddell seal appears on the IUCN Red List with a conservation status of “Least Concern”.  It is estimated this seal numbers over 800,000 individuals in the wild. First discovered in 1820s by a British sealing captain...

Antarctic Silverfish, Pleuragramma antarcticum
2012-04-02 17:14:35

The Antarctic Silverfish, (Pleuragramma antarcticum), is a member of the Notothenioidei family of fish. It is widely distributed around the Antarctic, but has largely disappeared from the western side of the northern Antarctic Peninsula based on 2010 research funded by the National Science Foundation. It is also found throughout the Southern Ocean. It grows to an average size of 6 inches, but has been known to reach lengths of up to 10 inches. It is usually pink with a silver tint, and...

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Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.