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Latest Antarctica Stories

Researchers Track Emperor Penguins From Space
2012-04-15 03:39:04

Thanks to new technology, a study reveals there to be twice as many emperor penguins in Antarctica than had previously been estimated. The study will be used as a benchmark to understand the effects climate change is having on these flightless birds. Published this week in the journal PLoS ONE, an international team of scientists reports how they used a Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite images to estimate the size of the emperor penguin communities. In order to distinguish the birds...

Long-Term Study Sheds New Light On Climate Change Impact
2012-04-06 09:03:10

Scientists working on an ongoing study investigating the impact of climate change on various ecosystems have revealed that habitants dependent upon areas that typically experience ice and snow during the winter months are the most threatened by increasing global temperatures. The finding comes after more than three decades worth of study as part of the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network, a National Science Foundation (NSF) initiative that features more than 1800 scientists and...

Satellite Observes Rapid Ice Shelf Disintegration In Antarctic
2012-04-06 04:16:49

As ESA´s Envisat satellite marks ten years in orbit, it continues to observe the rapid retreat of one of Antarctica´s ice shelves due to climate warming. One of the satellite´s first observations following its launch on 1 March 2002 was of break-up of a main section of the Larsen B ice shelf in Antarctica — when 3200 sq km of ice disintegrated within a few days due to mechanical instabilities of the ice masses triggered by climate warming. Now, with ten years of...

New Data Supports Einstein's Explanation For Dark Matter
2012-04-03 08:07:50

New information obtained by scientists using a 10-meter telescope located in Antarctica has strengthened the most widely accepted explanation for the mysterious force that is behind the increasingly rapid expansion of the universe, according to a pair of press releases published this week. According to a statement from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the most recent South Pole Telescope (SPT) data "strongly" supports Albert Einstein's cosmological constant, said to be the leading...

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2012-03-30 12:46:25

According to a press release from Europe´s Space administration (ESA) part of Antarctica´s ice sheet has increased in height. These findings come from the ESA´s ice-measuring satellite, CryoSat. According to the ESA, these findings not only provide good news from the ice sheets, but also show the effectiveness of their CryoSat missions. According to their website, ESA.int, CryoSat is Europe´s first mission to address the thickness of land and sea ice and how this...

Image 1 - West Antarctic Ice Shelves Tearing Apart at the Seams
2012-03-28 04:31:05

[ Watch the Video ] A new study examining nearly 40 years of satellite imagery has revealed that the floating ice shelves of a critical portion of West Antarctica are steadily losing their grip on adjacent bay walls, potentially amplifying an already accelerating loss of ice to the sea. The most extensive record yet of the evolution of the floating ice shelves in the eastern Amundsen Sea Embayment in West Antarctica shows that their margins, where they grip onto rocky bay walls or...

First-ever Use Of Airborne Resistivity System In Antarctica Allows Researchers To Look Beneath Surface In Untapped Territories
2012-03-24 03:01:55

NSF partners with international team to gather new information on hidden environments and past climate conditions in Antarctica National Science Foundation- (NSF) funded researchers have successfully tested equipment to map the hidden distribution of groundwater and ice in the McMurdo Dry Valleys region for the first time in Antarctica. The mapping technique, an airborne electrical resistivity instrument, will enable researchers to study microbial ecosystems in sub-glacial environments....

2012-03-21 15:35:12

The first day of spring brought record high temperatures across the northern part of the United States, while much of the Southwest was digging out from a record-breaking spring snowstorm. The weather, it seems, has gone topsy-turvy. Are the phenomena related? Are climate changes in one part of the world felt half a world away? To understand the present, scientists look for ways to unlock information about past climate hidden in the fossil record. A team of scientists led by Syracuse...

Evidence In Bahamas And Bermuda Suggests Increased Rise In Sea Levels
2012-03-15 11:45:55

Scientists are now predicting sea levels will climb another several inches -- or even a few feet -- by the year 2100, according to recent studies. Studying cliffs and ancient reefs on the sub-tropical islands of the Bahamas and Bermuda, scientists are investigating global sea rise and comparing these results against data from more than a century ago. The Bahamas and Bermuda have been attracting fossil hunters for many years. The land on the Bahamas, for example, is built on a foundation...


Latest Antarctica Reference Libraries

Antarctica
2013-02-18 10:15:24

Antarctica is the Earths southernmost continent; it contains the geographic South Pole. It’s situated in the Antarctic area of the Southern Hemisphere, almost completely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is bordered by the Southern Ocean. It’s the fifth-largest continent at 5.4 million sq miles. On average, it is the driest, coldest, and windiest continent as well as having the highest average elevation of all the continents. Considered a desert, the annual precipitation is only 8...

Ross Seal, Ommatophoca rossii
2013-01-01 15:44:30

The Ross seal (Ommatophoca rossii) is a true seal in the Phocidae family, and can only be found on pack ice in Antarctica. This species was formally described by James Clark Ross in 1841, during his British Antarctic Expedition. It is very uncommon to see in its range and rarely leaves the pack ice, with stray individuals occurring off southeast Australia or sub-Antarctic islands. The Ross seal can reach an average length between 5.5 and 6.9 feet, although some females can reach up to 8.2...

Weddell Seal, Leptonychotes weddellii
2012-06-27 21:35:24

The Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) is a large true seal in the Lobodontini tribe. It is native to Antarctica, with its range consisting of a large “ring” that surrounds Antarctica. This seal will spend most of its time in the water instead of on land. The Weddell seal appears on the IUCN Red List with a conservation status of “Least Concern”.  It is estimated this seal numbers over 800,000 individuals in the wild. First discovered in 1820s by a British sealing captain...

Antarctic Silverfish, Pleuragramma antarcticum
2012-04-02 17:14:35

The Antarctic Silverfish, (Pleuragramma antarcticum), is a member of the Notothenioidei family of fish. It is widely distributed around the Antarctic, but has largely disappeared from the western side of the northern Antarctic Peninsula based on 2010 research funded by the National Science Foundation. It is also found throughout the Southern Ocean. It grows to an average size of 6 inches, but has been known to reach lengths of up to 10 inches. It is usually pink with a silver tint, and...

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2009-08-18 20:48:47

Cryolophosaurus, meaning "cold crest lizard", is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Early Jurassic Period (Pliensbachian Age). It is known from the Hanson Formation (previously known as the Upper Falla Formation). It was discovered by paleontologist Dr. William Hammer in 1991. It was the first carnivorous dinosaur to be discovered in Antarctica. It was also the first dinosaur from Antarctica to be officially named. Dr. William Hammer and his team unearthed the dinosaur during the...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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