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Latest Antennal lobe Stories

How Flies Avoid Rotten Food
2012-12-07 07:23:29

[ Watch the Video: Flies Sniff Out and Avoid Spoiled Food ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Eating spoiled food can be fatal as it allows bacterial pathogens to enter the digestive system. One of the main tasks of the sense of smell is to detect signs of decay, allowing us and other animals to avoid such food poisoning. A new study, conducted by behavioral scientists and neurobiologists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, has decoded the neural...

2012-04-25 11:49:48

Newly developed analytic device 'Flywalk' allows accurate studies of insect behavior to be made In collaboration with colleagues from Portugal and Spain, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have developed an apparatus that automatically applies odors to an airstream, while filming and analyzing the behavior of insects simultaneously. The system is called Flywalk and consists of glass tubes, airstream regulators, and a video camera. The reactions...

2011-05-13 15:08:33

A single interneuron controls activity adaptively in 50,000 neurons, enabling consistently sparse codes for odors The brain is a coding machine: it translates physical inputs from the world into visual, olfactory, auditory, tactile perceptions via the mysterious language of its nerve cells and the networks which they form. Neural codes could in principle take many forms, but in regions forming bottlenecks for information flow (e.g., the optic nerve) or in areas important for memory, sparse...

2011-02-06 08:35:43

Mice know fear. And they know to fear the scent of a predator. But how do their brains quickly figure out with a sniff that a cat is nearby? It's a complex process that starts with the scent being picked up by specific receptors in their noses. But until now it wasn't clear exactly how these scent signals proceeded from nose to noggin for neural processing. In a study to be published in Nature (available online now to subscribers), Stanford researchers describe a new technique that makes it...

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2010-10-08 12:30:00

Solomon's lily imitates a yeasty odor to lure vinegar flies into a trap Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have solved a case of fraud that has been pending for 40 million years. Arum palaestinum, also called the Solomon's lily, attracts drosophilids (vinegar flies) as pollinators by emitting odor molecules that resemble those produced during alcoholic fermentation of rotting fruit initiated by yeast. The plant accomplishes the illusion of yeast...

2009-08-26 14:04:13

U.S. researchers say they've found short- and long-term memories in the fruit fly come from one gene activating different groups of neurons. Researchers at Cold Springs Harbor Laboratory and Stony Brook University say their discovery challenges the theory that short- and long-term memories result from changes in the same group of neurons. They found distinct groups of neurons are simultaneously activated when fruit flies learn a task. Rapid, short-lived activation in one group of neurons,...

2005-11-14 13:10:00

An international team of scientists, for the first time, has detected a memory trace in a living animal after it has encountered a single, new stimulus. The research, done with honeybees sensing new odors, allows neuroscientists to peer within the living brain and explore short-term memory as never before, according to scientist Roberto Fernández Galán, a leading author on the report who is currently a postdoctoral research associate at Carnegie Mellon University. Capturing these...

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2005-07-06 17:00:00

For newborn mammals, including humans, identifying Mom by her odor can be critical to maternal bonding and survival. However, researchers have not understood how this odor identification develops. Now, Kevin Franks and Jeffry Isaacson of the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report in the July 7, 2005, issue of Neuron that this process develops in basically the same way that newborns' developing visual systems learn to recognize the world. That is, during a critical...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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