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Latest Anthozoa Stories

2008-07-12 12:00:18

By Ludmilla Lelis, The Orlando Sentinel, Fla. Jul. 12--BISCAYNE NATIONAL PARK We nicknamed them "baby corals," several dozen pieces of boulder coral growing in neat rows under a dock on Biscayne Bay. Some are no bigger than a fist. A few larger pieces had broken off a reef. But someday they could grow into a huge reef and be homes for fish and marine critters. They are the insurance against the crisis predicted by Florida reef experts. The nursery under the dock was a key stop...

2008-07-12 06:00:16

By Oscar Corral, The Miami Herald Jul. 12--Fabian Pina Amargos arrived in Fort Lauderdale from Havana earlier this week with hopes of networking with his colleagues to find solutions to some of the problems facing coral reefs around the world. Instead, he wandered the cavernous exhibit halls at the Broward County Convention Center alone. Pina is the only one of four Cuban scientists who focus on coral reef research who was allowed to attend the International Coral Reef Symposium in...

2008-07-11 09:00:31

By Scott Harper, The Virginian-Pilot, Norfolk, Va. Jul. 11--NORFOLK -- Expect to see and hear Kent E. Carpenter a lot the next few days. The biology professor at Old Dominion University was scheduled to be on NBC's "Nightly News" on Thursday and on National Public Radio's "Science Friday" this afternoon. He also has been interviewed for pieces by the BBC, the British newspapers The Guardian and The Independent, National Geographic, Scientific American and the journal Science. Why...

2008-07-11 06:00:24

By Pala, Christopher Controlling Fishing to Save the Coral Reefs Across the world coral reefs are dying because of over-fishing. It is the fish which protect the reefs from excessive algae, the main culprit in coral death. For over a millennium, inhabitants of small islands who depended on seafood for survival practiced conservation or starved. In the 20th century, however, improvements in fishing gear and increased saefood demand have led to a breakdown of the once sustainable system. A...

2008-07-11 06:00:24

By Jenny Haworth Environment Correspondent A THIRD of the world's reef corals are at risk because of climate change and other human activities, scientists have warned. Carbon dioxide levels, coastal development, sewage discharge and overfishing are all putting coral species at the threat of extinction. Scientists said urgent conservation measures were needed or there could be mass biodiversity loss, and an impact on the hundreds of millions of people who rely on reef fish for food....

2008-07-09 21:00:15

North Carolina's most spectacular and unspoiled natural habitat doesn't get many visitors. It's so remote that most people would never notice if harm came to it. That's exactly why it deserves strong protection before it's too late. The Lophelia banks lie in deep North Carolina coastal waters, part of a chain of coral formations stretching from New England to the Florida keys. Only scientists in specially designed submersibles have seen them, but their findings portray an immensely rich...

2008-07-09 06:00:21

By Oscar Corral, The Miami Herald Jul. 9--The world's foremost scientific experts on coral reefs are gathering this week in Broward County to compare notes, network and identify problems and solutions for the ocean's most delicate ecosystem. The 11th International Coral Reef Symposium in Fort Lauderdale, which runs all week, marks the first time in more than 30 years that the conference, held every four years, is taking place in the United States. A team of U.S.-based scientists...

2008-07-09 00:00:16

By Bruce Henderson CHARLOTTE, N.C. - One of Earth's last frontiers lies off the Carolinas coast, on the cold, black ocean bottom 1,200 feet below the waves. Scientists are just beginning to explore deep-water coral reefs, possibly millions of years old, that stretch from North Carolina to Florida. They form pristine oases, alive with fish, crabs and weird creatures that one researcher says "look like Dr. Seuss went crazy down there." The discoveries have caught the attention of the Bush...

2008-07-08 06:00:19

By Robert Nolin & Rafael A. Olmeda, South Florida Sun-Sentinel Jul. 7--When it comes to the health of South Florida's coral reefs, the prognosis is not as gloomy as it could be. But it's not that sunny, either. Coral reefs stretching from the Keys to Martin County haven't deteriorated over the past five years, government scientists say. But that may be because damage inflicted over decades by storms, pollution, sewage and warmer temperatures has already been done. "Coral generally...

2008-07-08 03:00:12

Scientists said nearly half of all coral reef ecosystems under U.S. jurisdiction are in poor or fair condition. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said coral reefs are under threat from coastal development, fishing, sedimentation and recreational use. Even the most remote reefs are subject to threats such as marine debris, illegal fishing and climate-related effects of coral bleaching, disease and ocean acidification, NOAA said Monday in a release. A 569-page document...


Latest Anthozoa Reference Libraries

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
2012-04-03 20:41:16

Knotted Fan Coral, (Melithaea ochracea), is a species of colonial soft coral that is found in tree-like fans on shallow reefs in the South China Sea between Taiwan and Indonesia, including Singapore and Malaysia. In Taiwan, it is the most widespread coral in its family Gorgonacea. It is found on the higher parts of reef fronts where its numerous small polyps can feed at water flow rates varying from 1.6 to 16 inches per second. This species usually grow to about 8 inches in length, with...

738px-Galaxea_fascicularis_1
2012-04-03 20:18:21

Octopus Coral, (Galaxea fascicularis), also known as Fluorescence Grass Coral, Galaxy Coral. Star Coral, Crystal Coral, Brittle Coral and Starburst Coral, is a species of colonial stony coral commonly found on reef slopes in the Indian and Pacific ocean regions, as well as the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. It is most commonly found where wave action is weak, usually at a depth of 79 inches to 49 feet below sea level. It is a common coral species among reef aquarium enthusiasts. This coral...

601px-Echinophilia
2012-04-03 19:33:28

Chalice Corals, are a family of stony corals in the Pectiniidae family. Members of this family are mostly colonial but at least one species, Echinomorpha nishihirai, is solitary. These corals are endemic to the Indian and Pacific oceans. Pectiniids have a number of different forms but are basically streamlined and smooth. Polyps are large and brightly colored and resemble those of members of the Mussidae family of corals. The polyps are only extended at night. Tentacles are translucent,...

800px-Massive_Starlet_Coral_(Siderastrea_siderea)
2012-04-03 19:03:15

Siderastreidae is a family of colonial, reef building stony corals. Members of this family include symbiotic algae in their tissues which help provide their energy requirements. The World Register of Marine Species lists 7 genera within this family: Anomastraea, Coscinaraea, Craterastrea, Horastrea, Psammocora, Pseudosiderastrea, and Siderastrea. Corals in this family vary in form and include massive, thickly encrusting, columnar, and irregular forms. Corallites are linked by flowing...

800px-Leaf_plate_montipora.gk
2012-04-03 18:56:15

Leaf Plate Montipora, (Montipora capricornis), also known as Vase Coral, Cap Coral, or simply Montipora, is a species of stony coral found in the Indian and Pacific oceans. It is also found in reefs in the Red Sea. It usually inhabits the top half of the reef where photosynthesis can occur. It branches out from the foundation into an area with adequate sunlight. This species forms flat, plating colonies. The colonies expand by adding to their foundations and further spreading out....

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