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Latest Anthropocene Stories

2014-03-27 10:39:57

New international study by academics from the University of Leicester highlights unique nature of fossil footprint left behind by mankind A new study by an international team of scientists, including Dr Jan Zalasiewicz and Professor Mark Williams of the University of Leicester's Department of Geology, suggests that the fossil impact humans have made on the planet is vast and unprecedented in nature – and that there's been nothing remotely like it since the Earth formed, over four and...

Experts Convene On Uncertainties Of Global Water Resources
2013-05-20 13:27:19

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online This week, in Bonn, Germany — world experts are convening on the dangers posed to Earth´s most vital resource: water. "The list of human activities and their impact on the water systems of Planet Earth is long and important," said Anik Bhaduri, Executive Officer of the Global Water System Project (GWSP). "We have altered the Earth's climatology and chemistry, its snow cover, permafrost, sea and glacial ice extent and ocean...

Anthropocene Continues To Instigate Scientific Debate
2012-11-01 13:07:36

Geological Society of America GSA Annual Meeting Technical Session: "Geomorphology of the Anthropocene" How have humans influenced Earth? Can geoscientists measure when human impacts began overtaking those of Earth's other inhabitants and that of the natural Earth system? Responding to increasing scientific recognition that humans have become the foremost agent of change at Earth's surface, organizers of this GSA technical session have brought together speakers and poster presentations...

2012-04-02 11:10:12

International scientific community issues first “State of the Planet Declaration” Scientists issued the first "State of the Planet" declaration at a major gathering of experts on global environmental and social issues in advance of the major UN Summit Rio+20 in June. The declaration opens: "Research now demonstrates that the continued functioning of the Earth system as it has supported the well-being of human civilization in recent centuries is at risk." It states that...

2011-06-01 08:24:00

MILWAUKEE, June 1, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Economist, a globally-recognized international affairs magazine, has reported that scientists and academics are increasingly reaching a consensus that the impact of human activity has so dramatically shaped the Earth as to herald a new geological age. The power of human potential was also identified by ManpowerGroup (NYSE: MAN), the world leader in innovative workforce solutions, earlier this year as being behind the dawn of the Human Age, where...

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2011-02-02 22:26:36

Human influence on the landscape, global warming, sea level rise, ocean acidification and biodiversity are highlighted in a new set of studies led by University of Leicester researchers.How this influence will be reflected in the distinctive geological record forms the basis of the studies published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A.Jan Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams from the University of Leicester Department of Geology led the production of the studies into the...

2010-07-01 16:33:15

Even before the dawn of agriculture, people may have caused the planet to warm up, a new study suggests. Mammoths used to roam modern-day Russia and North America, but are now extinct"”and there's evidence that around 15,000 years ago, early hunters had a hand in wiping them out. A new study, accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), argues that this die-off had the side effect of heating up the planet. "A lot of people...

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2010-05-24 06:16:30

The extinction of mammoths and other megafauna that came after humans spread out across the New World may be one explanation of a sharp decline in global temperatures more than 12,750 years ago, researchers reported on Sunday. Roughly a hundred species of grass-eating giants that once flourished on the North American landscape released massive quantities of methane during their lifetime. As a heat-trapping greenhouse gas, methane is 30 times more potent than carbon dioxide. It may not have...

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2010-04-14 13:13:04

In just two centuries, humans have wrought such vast and unprecedented changes to our world that we actually might be ushering in a new geological time period that could alter the planet for millions of years, according to a group of prominent scientists that includes a Nobel Laureate. They say the dawning of this new epoch could lead to the sixth largest mass extinction in the Earth's history. Their commentary appears in ACS' bi-weekly journal Environmental Science & Technology. Jan...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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