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Latest Anthropology Stories

2012-12-14 12:19:49

Insights from Characterizing Extinct Human Gut Microbiomes A University of Oklahoma-led study has demonstrated that ancient DNA can be used to understand ancient human microbiomes.  The microbiomes from ancient people have broad reaching implications for understanding recent changes to human health, such as what good bacteria might have been lost as a result of our current abundant use of antibiotics and aseptic practices. Cecil M. Lewis Jr., professor of anthropology in the OU...

Homo Floresiensis Facial Reconstruction Revealed
2012-12-12 06:09:02

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the major features of the Australian Archaeological Association's (AAA) Conference at the University of Wollongong this week was the unveiling of the face of Homo floresiensis — popularly known as the "Hobbit." Hosted by UOW´s Centre for Archaeological Science, which was created in 2010 to develop, integrate and apply modern scientific methods to the questions of human evolution, the conference consists of over 400...

Early African Homo Sapiens Were First Technologically Advanced People
2012-12-06 12:56:14

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Africa, and especially South Africa, is one-step closer to being confirmed as the primary center for the early development of human behavior. Scientists have searched for the origin of modern human behavior and technological advancement among our early African ancestors for a long time. Wits University archaeologist Christopher Henshilwood, along with a team of international researchers, has published the first detailed summary...

2012-11-29 12:40:51

The origin and dispersal of modern humans and modern human behavior are key interests in Paleolithic archaeology and anthropology. Engraved objects are usually seen as a hallmark of cognition and symbolism, which are viewed as important features of modern human behavior. In recent years, engraved ochre, bones and ostrich eggs unearthed from various Paleolithic sites in Africa, the Near East and Europe have attracted the attention of many scholars. However, such items are rarely...

2012-11-28 13:04:46

Men may share more genes with sisters' kids than with cheating wife's kids A University of Utah study produced new mathematical support for a theory that explains why men in some cultures often feed and care for their sisters' children: where extramarital sex is common and accepted, a man's genes are more likely to be passed on by their sister's kids than by their wife's kids. The theory previously was believed valid only if a man was likely to be the biological father of less than one...

Grass Was Quite Yummy For Early Human Ancestors
2012-11-14 05:23:12

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Our ancestors about 3.5 million years ago had a diet that mainly consisted of tropical grasses and sedges, according to a new study. Scientists reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) that they extracted information from the fossilized teeth of three Australopithecus bahrelghazali individuals, which were the first early hominins excavated at two sites in Africa. "We found evidence suggesting that early...

2012-10-26 04:01:19

Turkey Weddings has celebrated another successful season of wedding planning and welcomed a surge of bookings for beach weddings set in the chic and uber romantic Oludeniz resort. (PRWEB) October 25, 2012 In recent months the team of wedding planners have witnessed a steep rise in bookings for 2013 Turkey beach weddings and luxury boutique hotel nuptials. It´s easy to see why so many couples would choose Oludeniz beach as their dream venue. The world famous landmark provides the...

2012-10-24 23:45:41

Pica and geophagy are much more prevalent in Madagascar than earlier researchers believed Though it was identified as a disorder as early as the 14th century, pica, or the eating of non-food items, has for years believed to be all but non-existent in a few corners of the globe — a 2006 study that reviewed research on pica found just four regions — the South of South America, Japan, Korea and Madagascar —where the behavior had never been observed. A new Harvard study,...

2012-10-15 15:16:36

Research that was coordinated at Carlos III University of Madrid (UC3M) analyzes the mythological images in Roman mosaics and shows that members of the most powerful elite selected Greek gods and heroes as symbols of universal values that reinforced what Rome stood for. This line of research, coordinated by Luz Neira, who is a professor in the Department of Humanities: History, Geography and Art, as well as a researcher in UC3M´s Institute for Culture and Technology (Instituto de...


Latest Anthropology Reference Libraries

Primatology
2013-10-02 13:00:50

Primatology is the study of primates that focuses on their behaviors and possible evolution. Those who practice this science, known as primatologists, focus on primates in the wild and in laboratory settings. There are many different sub-divisions of primatology that differ based on methodology and theory, but the two major branches are Western primatology and Japanese primatology. There share basic principles, but differ culturally and in many other regards. Western primatology originated...

Zooarchaeology
2013-09-30 13:29:48

Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains including shells, bones, hides, scales, DNA, chitin, and hair. Shells and bones are most frequently studied because these do not decay at a fast rate, but most remains do not survive because they break or decompose. In eastern areas of North America, Zooarchaeology developed over three periods. The first, known as the Formative period, occurred in the 1860s and was not a specific area of study at that time. The second period, known as the...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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