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Latest Antimicrobial peptides Stories

2013-11-01 10:40:00

The ever-increasing threat from "superbugs" -- strains of pathogenic bacteria that are impervious to the antibiotics that subdued their predecessor generations -- has forced the medical community to look for bactericidal weapons outside the realm of traditional drugs. One promising candidate is the antimicrobial peptide (AMP), one of Mother Nature's lesser-known defenses against infections, that kills a pathogen by creating, then expanding, nanometer-sized pores in the cell membrane until it...

2013-10-16 23:26:25

Announcement comes on the first day of the North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference, where the latest data on N8's patented biopharmaceutical will be presented. Columbus, OH (PRWEB) October 16, 2013 N8 Medical, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company commercializing innovative therapeutics and combination devices to address critical unmet needs in infectious disease and oncology, today announced that Michael Triplett, Ph.D. assumed the role of Chief Executive Officer of N8 Medical on...

Biophysicists Zoom In On Pore-forming Toxin
2013-08-15 09:08:14

Rice University Study of melittin-based pore formation also applies to anticancer drugs A new study by Rice University biophysicists offers the most comprehensive picture yet of the molecular-level action of melittin, the principal toxin in bee venom. The research could aid in the development of new drugs that use a similar mechanism as melittin's to attack cancer and bacteria. The study appears this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Melittin does its...

2013-04-25 11:40:28

Biologists at UC San Diego have identified eight genes never before suspected to play a role in wound healing that are called into action near the areas where wounds occur. Their discovery, detailed this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, was made in the laboratory fruit fly Drosophila. But the biologists say many of the same genes that regulate biological processes in the hard exoskeleton, or cuticle, of Drosophila also control processes in human skin. That makes them attractive...

Combining Synthetic And Natural Toxins Could Disarm Cancer And Drug-resistant Bacteria
2013-02-12 08:22:35

Rice University Cancer researchers from Rice University suggest that a new man-made drug that's already proven effective at killing cancer and drug-resistant bacteria could best deliver its knockout blow when used in combination with drugs made from naturally occurring toxins. "One of the oldest tricks in fighting is the one-two punch -- you distract your opponent with one attack and deliver a knockout blow with another," said José Onuchic of Rice's Center for Theoretical...

Pandas Could One Day Help Fight Superbugs
2012-12-31 05:48:32

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The immune system of the giant panda could help scientists develop new treatment for drug-resistant superbugs and other types of diseases, researchers have discovered. Lead researcher Dr. Xiuwen Yan of the Nanjing Agricultural University's Life Sciences College and colleagues discovered that the immune cells of the endangered creatures produce an antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin-AM, that is effective in wiping out bacteria....

2012-09-24 22:22:57

Kansas State University researchers have discovered a molecule that may be capable of delivering drugs inside the body to treat diseases. For the first time, researchers have designed and created a membrane-bounded vesicle formed entirely of peptides -- molecules made up of amino acids, the building blocks of protein. The membrane could serve as a new drug delivery system to safely treat cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. A study led by John Tomich, professor of biochemistry at...

2012-09-24 22:15:32

Exposed tissue surfaces, including skin and mucous membranes, are under constant threat of attack by microorganisms in the environment. The layer of cells that line these areas, known as epithelial cells, are the first line of defense against these pathogens, but the underlying molecular mechanisms that allow them to repel microbes are unknown. In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, report that epithelial cells in the...

2012-07-25 09:31:19

Researchers: Findings about innate peptide may offer new avenue of research for combating HIV, other viruses Human defensins, aptly named antimicrobial peptides, are made in immune system cells and epithelial cells (such as skin cells and cells that line the gut). One of these peptides, human neutrophil peptide 1, under certain circumstances hinders HIV infection, but exactly how it works remains unclear. HIV entry into mature T-helper cells (cells essential to the immune system)...

2012-05-29 10:15:39

The answers may help clear the way for a new class of antibiotics For 50 years scientists have been unsure how the bacteria that gives humans cholera manages to resist one of our basic innate immune responses. That mystery has now been solved, thanks to research from biologists at The University of Texas at Austin. The answers may help clear the way for a new class of antibiotics that don't directly shut down pathogenic bacteria such as V. cholerae, but instead disable their defenses so...


Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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